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Old 11-30-2007, 09:10 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by rabidgerbil
How many times would you need to step up a starter to get up to a 2000 ml starter?
The general rule is no more than 10 times per volume of slurry/starter.

So if you start with 10ml of yeast slurry, add about 100 ml wort starter, and increase accordingly until you get to 2000ml.

(Edit: Once you've got 100ml, you can step up to 1000ml 24hrs later, etc.)
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:15 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by iamjonsharp
The general rule is no more than 10 times per volume of slurry/starter.

So if you start with 10ml of yeast slurry, add about 100 ml wort starter, and increase accordingly until you get to 2000ml.

(Edit: Once you've got 100ml, you can step up to 1000ml 24hrs later, etc.)

NOTE: this is not a smart a$$ response

Thank you, and I do know the rule, but that does not answer my question about his slant tubes. I know what ten ml of yeast slurry would look like, but I have no idea how to figure out how much yeast is in one of those little tubes he is making, or how one would go about getting what is in those tubes into a starter...

I don't imagine that you can warm up the tube enough to melt the gelatin and dump it out, without killing the yeast, so I am figuring that he must use something like a loop to get a sample back out of the tube and inoculate a starter with that.
That being the case, and the ten times rule added in, I would think that this would take a while to be able to have a usable size starter.
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:21 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by rabidgerbil
So how you use one of those tubes? How do you get the yeast into your starter?
How many times would you need to step up a starter to get up to a 2000 ml starter?
To go from a slant to a pitchable quantity of yeast, I basically step it up 3 times.
I start with a test tube with about 10mL of wort in it (I prepare those in advance also), take an eye dropper and squirt some of the wort into the slant, and use my inoculating loop to swirl it a bit and scrape the yeast off the surface to get it in solution. Then I dump it into the test tube - at that point it's just a very small starter.
Once the yeast has grown sufficiently, I pitch the contents of the test tube into a 100mL starter, and once that is done I pitch into a 1L starter.

So basically, I am just following the 10:1 rule, and just considering the slant to be about equivalent to 1mL of yeast slurry. I am certain that it is usually equivalent to more yeast than that, but I figure that going from the slant to the first tiny starter is the most critical step, so I play it safe.

I know that some people who use slants skip some of this and go straight from a slant into a larger (500mL or so) starter, and have it done in 24-36 hours, and then straight into a 1-2L starter from there. I don't mind adding the extra step, playing it safe whenever I can afford to do so.
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:25 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Funkenjaeger
To go from a slant to a pitchable quantity of yeast, I basically step it up 3 times.
I start with a test tube with about 10mL of wort in it (I prepare those in advance also), take an eye dropper and squirt some of the wort into the slant, and use my inoculating loop to swirl it a bit and scrape the yeast off the surface to get it in solution. Then I dump it into the test tube - at that point it's just a very small starter.
Once the yeast has grown sufficiently, I pitch the contents of the test tube into a 100mL starter, and once that is done I pitch into a 1L starter.

So basically, I am just following the 10:1 rule, and just considering the slant to be about equivalent to 1mL of yeast slurry. I am certain that it is usually equivalent to more yeast than that, but I figure that going from the slant to the first tiny starter is the most critical step, so I play it safe.

I know that some people who use slants skip some of this and go straight from a slant into a larger (500mL or so) starter, and have it done in 24-36 hours, and then straight into a 1-2L starter from there. I do multiple steps as I described whenever I have the time to do so, because I have heard that it's safest to stick to a 10:1 step up ratio for each starter as a rule of thumb - and I prefer to play it safe when I can afford to do so.
Ok, so my next obvious question is, how long does that process take?
You decide that you want to brew a particular style, and need a specific yeast for it, how many days in advance do you need to prepare before brew day?
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:46 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by rabidgerbil
Ok, so my next obvious question is, how long does that process take?
You decide that you want to brew a particular style, and need a specific yeast for it, how many days in advance do you need to prepare before brew day?
Wish I had a better answer, but so far I haven't tried rushing it to see how quickly I can get a starter made - I've just been letting them sit "more than long enough" in each starter, as I've been planning far enough in advance. I guess offhand I'd say maybe 3 days, one for each step?

One thing you can do is make a pitchable-sized starter, ferment it out, crash cool, decant some liquid, swirl and pour into a sanitized beer bottle, cap it and refrigerate until brew day. Would be a good way to keep your most-used yeast varieties (and any you thought you'd be using in the near future) on hand in pitchable quantities, while keeping a wide variety of yeast on hand in the form of slants.
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