Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Poll about sugar/water priming...
View Poll Results: How do you prime - boil water/no water, let cool/don't let cool
Boil water with sugar, let cool prior to priming 68 52.71%
Boil water with sugar, don't let cool prior to priming 49 37.98%
No water at all - mix sugar straight in the beer. 7 5.43%
None of the above 5 3.88%
Voters: 129. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-31-2008, 06:47 PM   #21
MVKTR2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Attala Co., MS
Posts: 1,066
Liked 19 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default

After THOROUGHLY cleaning the kitchen and while my bier bottles are in the dish washer's dry cycle I pull out my bier and equipment. As soon as the botttles are dry I place 2 boilers on the stove, one with caps and one for the sugar. By the time I have all my equipment/bottling bucket sanitized etc. my sugar water is usually cool! Works out just fine, but I can't imagine that small amount of hot liquid could do any damage if the occasion arises where I have to dump hot liquid into the bier!

Hmmmm sugar cubes that's intersting!

Schlante,
Phillip

__________________

"Perhaps wisdom for me is understanding how truely small I am, and that there is no smug self centered moment of clarity when there is so much more to learn" Anthony Bourdain

MVKTR2 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2008, 07:34 PM   #22
BigSlick
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by conpewter View Post
Problem here is that you don't drink it at 70 degrees, so you'll have less than 2.5 volumes, you need to calculate at the serving temp.

Using the nomograph in Palmers book (p.113) and working backwards it is the temp of the beer when you bottle. Example: A line from 4 ounces of corn sugar drawn through 2.5 volumes of co2 goes to 70 degrees.

Below the nomograph Palmer says, "To use the nomograph, draw a line from the temperature of your beer through the volumes of carbon dioxide that you want, to the scale for sugar".
__________________

Reason: punctuation
BigSlick is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-05-2009, 04:06 PM   #23
Homercidal
Moderator
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Reed City, MI
Posts: 24,161
Liked 2349 Times on 1667 Posts
Likes Given: 1317

Default

I have been boiling and cooling, but I might just start pouring the beer on top of hot sugar water now. I get the idea that the sugar water is going to cool very quickly, and the fact is that it can't be killing too many yeasts before it's cooled down.

__________________
Homercidal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-27-2011, 03:48 PM   #24
jimlin
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Merrimac, MA
Posts: 159
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default reviving an old thread

I have only bottled two 5 gal batches thus far. 1st time was an amber and I forgot to cool the previously boiled water/corn sugar solution. The amber had it's own problems (too sweet, my fault) but it was evenly carbonated.

The second batch was a Sierra PA clone that was much more like what I was shooting for (yeah!) but I've found extreme fluxuations in the carbonation. Considering how I would box capped bottles as I completely them, it's safe to say that one 12-pack would be 12 bottles that were filled in order. I found I had one 12-pack that contained over carbonated bottles, compared to the other 12-packs. I believe it was the 1st set of bottles filled, so it consisted of the beer from the bottom of the bottling bucket. I poured into pint or even 22 oz glasses and watched them fill with foam (3/4 foam). The aroma was fantastic seeing that the overcabonation was driving the aromatics out.

For this batch I had boiled the corn sugar in water and then cooled in an ice bath. It may have even been cooled below the temp of the beer I was racking from the fermenter (which was around 66-67°). I started the siphon and poured in the priming solution slowly along the side of the bucket right away, so it was in there before 95% of the beer had been moved. I did not swirl or mix, I simply relied on the beer ciming in from the siphon to mix with the solution.

Would the temp of the priming solution being too cold cause it to sit at the bottom of the bottling bucket despite the beer being siphoned? If so, it would explain why the first bottles I filled were overly carbonated in the end. (all bottles were then stored together in the same closet, experiencing the same temps (mid-upper 60s) for carb'ing and conditioning.

I'm bringing this up now because I will soon have my bavarian hefe ready to bottle, and am considering not cooling the solution if it will mean a more even distribution of the priming sugar

__________________
jimlin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yay or Nay: Boil Water w/ Priming Sugar? StrictlyIPAs Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 48 01-19-2013 08:12 PM
cane sugar vs priming (corn) sugar for priming... timgman Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 11 10-24-2012 01:13 AM
Quick question- Water to priming sugar ratio for Conditioning A 5 gallon keg? Airlock_Sniffer Bottling/Kegging 1 10-29-2009 01:20 AM
Air pump / Water pump / Priming sugar Bru General Techniques 3 07-17-2009 12:15 PM
Priming sugar: poll MattHollingsworth Bottling/Kegging 9 07-02-2009 09:14 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS