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Old 07-10-2009, 09:03 PM   #1
hopsy
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Default pitching two different yeasts

so, i was inspired by a previous homebrew experiment where i bottled a euro-amber into the dregs of a freshly poured new belgium triple, essentially adding a bit of their belgian strain to my amber, for which i used an english ale yeast. it came out great, probably the best out of the whole batch. im trying to recreate that. so i came up with the idea of using english ale, and belgian yeast together. im sure someone here has tried something like this before. my debate is whether i should pitch them both in the beginning, or the belgian into the secondary, or into the primary after the english yeast has done most of the work, say 3 days in. if anyone has any experience or insights into the implications of this it would be greatly appreciated. thanks!

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Old 07-10-2009, 10:00 PM   #2
Jamo99
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Look at the attenuations of both strains. The belgian more than likely has a higher attenuation. You could let the english ferment out completely, then pitch the belgian strain, which should take care of some additional gravity points. Without a starter for the belgian, you may give them a bit of a shock if it's a reasonably high alcohol environment. I think if you watched for the krausen to fall and pitched then, you would probably be ok.

You could always pitch both at the beginning, but the belgian character would be stronger (which could be a good thing.) Read the description and the other "stats" for each of the strains and try to picture what you want your final product to really be like.

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Old 07-11-2009, 08:21 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Jamo99 View Post
Look at the attenuations of both strains. The belgian more than likely has a higher attenuation. You could let the english ferment out completely, then pitch the belgian strain, which should take care of some additional gravity points. Without a starter for the belgian, you may give them a bit of a shock if it's a reasonably high alcohol environment. I think if you watched for the krausen to fall and pitched then, you would probably be ok.

You could always pitch both at the beginning, but the belgian character would be stronger (which could be a good thing.) Read the description and the other "stats" for each of the strains and try to picture what you want your final product to really be like.
thanks!
thats basically what i was thinking. i didnt want too much esters and whatnot from the belgian so i didnt want to pitch that first. the beer i bottled that i talked about in the original post had a real smooth clean taste that the others of the same batch didnt. im geussing that the belgian yeast cleaned up some things that the english yeast didnt take care of. im trying to duplicate this with having a mostly english flavor profile with real subtle belgian influence. thanks for the response!
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Future Brews: ?
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Secondary: euro belgian imperial amber. cherry steam pilsner
Bottled: stout, belgian dubble , liberty IPA, nectarine amber,under the pines IPA, oaked cider

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