Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Pitching technique
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-03-2008, 05:15 PM   #1
BeerAg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 152
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Pitching technique

So, I recently upgraded to 10 gallon batches.

However, I ferment in 5 gallon buckets.

For the second time in a row, I have one bucket chugging away and one bucket standing still.

I had a white labs vial with a 3/8 gallon starter.

I have been shaking up the starter real well, then pouring half into each bucket. Yet for some reason, no action in one bucket.

Last go round, the fermentation on the slow bucket stuck after 2 weeks. I racked into a carboy, and the yeastcake was very, very thin. I had to finish off with some nottingham.

Any tips?

__________________
BeerAg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2008, 05:20 PM   #2
IrregularPulse
Hobby Collector
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
IrregularPulse's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 43,542
Liked 2798 Times on 2745 Posts
Likes Given: 122

Default

Have you noticed if it's the first or second bucket you pour the yeast into each time? Could be all the yeast coming out first into one bucket or staying behind for the second each time. Try 2 separate starters? Or Is it the same bucket each time? "What is the common variable between the multiple instances of batches not fermenting?" is basically what I'm getting at here.

__________________
Tap Room Hobo

I should have stuck to four fingers in Vegas. :o - marubozo
IrregularPulse is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2008, 07:18 PM   #3
BeerAg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 152
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Hrmm.

This time it was the second bucket that isn't working yet, but I'm not sure about last time.

Since it was an ale yeast, do you think all the active beasties congregated at the top?

__________________
BeerAg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2008, 08:29 PM   #4
TexLaw
Here's Lookin' Atcha!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
TexLaw's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 3,698
Liked 25 Times on 24 Posts

Default

I've never split a starter like that, so I don't know. You would think that mixing the starter well would homogenize it enough, but the evidence suggests the contrary.


TL

__________________
Beer is good for anything from hot dogs to heartache.

Drinking Frog Brewery, est. 1993
TexLaw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2008, 09:00 PM   #5
BeerAg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 152
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Okay, say you have to split one vial of yeast between two primary buckets.

How would the Brewtalk gurus do it? My method is obviously not working that great.

__________________
BeerAg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-10-2008, 04:35 PM   #6
BeerAg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 152
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Update

So, the beer that had trouble starting wound up tasting terrible. It has an astringent, medicinal taste to it that I have not been able to age away as of yet. I'll give it another week, and let it hit the drain to free up the keg space.

Question 1) Do you think the off flavors were caused by the strained yeast, or do you think I might have had an infection which impacted the fermentation process. I am leaning towards the former, because a packet of nottingham finished the fermentation up quickly.

I have since started using one vial of yeast in two seperate starters. I just shake up the yeast, split it between two half gallons of DME water, and proceed as normal. This has worked flawlessly the last two times.

Question 2) any potential drawbacks in splitting a vial of yeast into 2 starters?

__________________
BeerAg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-10-2008, 04:42 PM   #7
hal simmons
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 104
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I had a similar issue last batch. Split 7 gallons into two carboys, pitched half the yeast starter into each. One batch fermented out in 3 days, the other took 9 days.

When I pitched I swirled the starter, poured a bit into one carboy, swirled again, poured some into the other, etc... I went back and forth and each carboy got about 3 pours. I thought this would avoid the issue, but apparently not.

Is there anything else that could cause this other than the yeast?

__________________
hal simmons is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-10-2008, 04:45 PM   #8
TexLaw
Here's Lookin' Atcha!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
TexLaw's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 3,698
Liked 25 Times on 24 Posts

Default

1) I don't know. It could be either or both.

2) It doesn't sound like it.


TL

__________________
Beer is good for anything from hot dogs to heartache.

Drinking Frog Brewery, est. 1993
TexLaw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-10-2008, 04:45 PM   #9
RegionalChaos
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Drain, OR
Posts: 606
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Might be worth splitting the starter up, and letting it settle out to make sure there is approximately the same amount of yeast in each...

__________________
How I brew: Stir plate starters, Extract, Full boil in a Keggle, 10 gallon batches.
Brewing upgrades in progress: temp controlled ferment, stir plate re-work, building mash tun, milling station

Planned House Ales: an Amber, an IPA, a dark IPA, a Mango Ale, a blueberry oatmeal stout, a dry Irish stout, a honey wheat, Apfelwien

What kind of R-Value does your ferm chamber need? - http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/what...hamber-190459/
RegionalChaos is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-10-2008, 07:55 PM   #10
Gordie
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Healdsburg, CA
Posts: 405
Liked 26 Times on 7 Posts

Default

I don't think it would have much to do with your yeast strain if you starter is viable. One issue may be in the composition of the wort you're pitching on to. There may be more yeast nutrients in one fermenter than another, depending on how they're in suspension when you split your wort. See if throwing some nutirent in helps and check to make sure you're airating both fermenters equally.

__________________
Healdsburg Beer Company
Sonoma County, California

Kevin.McGee@HealdsburgBeerCo.com
Gordie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yeast Pitching Technique hightest Mead Forum 2 02-07-2009 05:31 PM
AG technique(s)? DarinB General Techniques 14 10-19-2007 02:57 AM
I Had To Try This Technique Sometime! hialtitude General Techniques 15 10-04-2007 06:20 PM
dry hop technique kfgolfer General Techniques 5 12-30-2006 07:54 PM
Technique?! hoppy All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 6 01-24-2006 09:03 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS