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Old 06-23-2009, 12:46 AM   #1
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Default Pitching on the cake + aeration

So I'm thinking there's no burning need to aerate a wort that is pitched onto a yeast cake. My understanding is that the purpose of aeration is to supply oxygen that yeast need during reproduction / population growth, and that once fermentation begins the little beasties need no more oxygen. Since a cake is "mostly" viable yeast, it shouldn't reproduce much and therefore wort pitched on a cake shouldn't need aerated.

Am I off base here?

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Old 06-23-2009, 01:00 AM   #2
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Except that you'll miss out on the growth phase of the yeast and the flavors/esters that imparts.

Mr. Malty has a pitch calculator for the amount of slurry you would need to pitch so that you don't "overpitch."

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Old 06-23-2009, 01:13 AM   #3
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I dont aerate when I pitch onto a cake.

On second thought, I dont aerate anything at all, I dont have a stone or whatever, so I am no help.

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Old 06-23-2009, 03:29 AM   #4
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Except that you'll miss out on the growth phase of the yeast and the flavors/esters that imparts.

Mr. Malty has a pitch calculator for the amount of slurry you would need to pitch so that you don't "overpitch."
I realize that Mr. Malty has a calculator. My question was simply about aeration. Seems to me that there are a few beers out there that might benefit from a quick, esterless fermentation.

I plan to try out a small split batch- pitch one to spec, and pitch the other with the entire rest of a cake.
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Old 06-23-2009, 03:32 AM   #5
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With any beer where you would use Nottingham, US-05, US-04, 1056, or any other "clean" flavor profile just pitch on the cake, no aeration needed. Fermentation will be done in 2-3 days and as long as you control the profile it will finish out clean and ferment out completely. My last pale ale I pitched onto a cake of 1056 and it blew off 4 hours after I pitched...crazy stuff!

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Old 06-23-2009, 10:32 PM   #6
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Pouring the wort into the fermenter with a yeast cake should be any/all aeration needed when using a cake or a lot of slurry.

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Old 06-23-2009, 11:59 PM   #7
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it boggles my mind that anybody would want to pitch onto a yeast cake.

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Old 06-24-2009, 03:01 AM   #8
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Quote:
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it boggles my mind that anybody would want to pitch onto a yeast cake.
Why not? There's plenty to recommend it- it's a guaranteed, fast-starting fermentation that hits FG quickly.
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Old 06-24-2009, 04:03 AM   #9
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Quote:
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it boggles my mind that anybody would want to pitch onto a yeast cake.
Please explain. I consider a yeast cake a 5 gallon starter.
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Old 06-24-2009, 04:19 AM   #10
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+1 to the goodness of the yeast cake.
I won't usually do it if I have to keep the cake longer than overnight, but if I bottle/rack one night and know I am planning a brew the next day, I will always try and pitch on the yeast cake. It is a HUGE starter, and I hear that is good, plus you save either the $6 for liquid yeast or $2 for dry. I can understand some of the ultra snob brewers will not want the possible autolysis, leftover trub, or hop residue but I have never had a bad brew from a cake pitch, just doesn't happen. Hell, I have cross pitched before, putting a cider on top of a beer cake. Grow a pair and try some stuff!

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