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Old 02-19-2007, 09:44 PM   #1
BrooZer
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Default Oxygenation through Bottling Wand.

Well I know that I am not supposed to oxygenate my beer but when I bottle there is so much pressure in the wand that no matter how lightly i start the fill it comes rushing out and makes bubbles.

Is this a problem??

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Old 02-19-2007, 09:59 PM   #2
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I was thinking about this a bit because I forgot to purge the oxygen from my keg before I force carbonated. Then I remembered, typically in bottling, the oxygen isn't purged from the head space of each bottle (in homebrewing) before capping. So this will infuse that bit of o2 into the beer as it naturally carbonates. That amount of oxygen is much more than a split second of spurt coming from the bottling wand itself. I figure you don't really have anything to worry about.

If you plan to let your bottles age for 10 years, then maybe you should worry but not really.

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Old 02-19-2007, 10:26 PM   #3
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It will not be a problem so don't worry. Some of the bubbles you are seeing could also be CO2 coming out of solution in the wort.

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Old 04-15-2007, 10:35 PM   #4
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I had the same problem with bubbles during the bottling process. I'm glad to hear that it won't be much of a problem.

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Old 04-15-2007, 10:56 PM   #5
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I agree it's nothing to worry about. If you have any lingering concerns, you could get some oxygen absorning caps, but they're cost you a little more and there's some debate on wheter or not they're worth it. For my first batch, I wanted to get them "just in case" but the LHBS owner talked me out of it and I've been fine without them.

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Old 04-16-2007, 01:28 AM   #6
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I just had a similar problem while racking to secondary-I developed bubbles in the hose several times and had to re-start the siphon each time. The result was a good deal of bubbles backing up into the carboy.
Every racking before this had gone very smoothly-any reason why it backs up or advice on a better way to siphon?

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Old 04-16-2007, 02:34 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewDey
I just had a similar problem while racking to secondary-I developed bubbles in the hose several times and had to re-start the siphon each time. The result was a good deal of bubbles backing up into the carboy.
Every racking before this had gone very smoothly-any reason why it backs up or advice on a better way to siphon?
Have you invested in an auto siphon?. They work like a charm and siphon quietly, I've never had any problems with them.

As for you siphon trouble, I can only assume there wasn't a good seal on your tube and racking cane? Other than that, I'm not too sure. Try the auto siphon if you haven't already, it works great!
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Old 04-16-2007, 02:40 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoplobster
Have you invested in an auto siphon?. They work like a charm and siphon quietly, I've never had any problems with them.

As for you siphon trouble, I can only assume there wasn't a good seal on your tube and racking cane? Other than that, I'm not too sure. Try the auto siphon if you haven't already, it works great!
No-haven't used one of those yet. Looks like a worthy investment.
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Old 04-16-2007, 09:15 AM   #9
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The beer will be depleted of oxygen during the initial ferment but will be full of dissolved CO2, almost certainly what you are seing is CO2 coming out of solution.
If you think of it that way its actually benefical, that released CO2 will fill up the head space between the beer and the cap removing the ambient air which is 21% O2 meaning you are less likely to get oxidation.

Either way RDWHAHB, some people (belgians) would tell you that the very small amount of oxidation is important in the aging process of bottled beers.

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Old 04-16-2007, 03:39 PM   #10
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Beer at that point has abbout one volume of carbonation. So most of the bubbles are CO2. Then, set the cap on as you fill, but don't crimp it yet. Go ahead and fill severasl bottles, setting the caps on each as you go. The co2 out of the beer will push the air out. Then seat the caps, in approximate order.

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