New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Open Fermentation




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-13-2011, 05:50 PM   #21
eastoak
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: oakland, california
Posts: 3,138
Liked 143 Times on 135 Posts
Likes Given: 79

Default

i'm trying my first open fermentation, pitched the yeast yesterday at 1630 pacific time and this short video was shot at 0930 this morning.



__________________
eastoak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2011, 02:19 PM   #22
gr8shandini
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Philly
Posts: 782
Liked 52 Times on 40 Posts

Default

The way I see it, an airlock is already essentially open fermentation. 1" of water is .036 psi. I doubt the yeast can tell the difference between 14.7 and 14.736 psi. So unless you're trying to introduce something wild (or are using 3 feet of water in your blowoff bucket), there's really no reason to change the standard process.



__________________
gr8shandini is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2011, 06:16 PM   #23
eastoak
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: oakland, california
Posts: 3,138
Liked 143 Times on 135 Posts
Likes Given: 79

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gr8shandini View Post
The way I see it, an airlock is already essentially open fermentation. 1" of water is .036 psi. I doubt the yeast can tell the difference between 14.7 and 14.736 psi. So unless you're trying to introduce something wild (or are using 3 feet of water in your blowoff bucket), there's really no reason to change the standard process.
i was not thinking of the psi angle but in a sense open fermentation has been the standard process for wits and hefeweizens for at least hundreds of years. beer in general for a lot longer. there is a definite difference between an open fermented beer and the new "standard" process. i'm certainly no expert but i would imagine that the risk of contamination is one of the few reasons this is no longer widely practiced. if the risk can be minimized then there is no reason not to do it, for me anyway. an increase in esters and phenols has been shown with open fermentation which is why i decided to see for myself with this experiment.*


disclaimer: i am not an brew scientist or expert just a wacko with a few sacks of grain, a grain mill, brewing equipment, books and some free time. i could be wrong about everything.
__________________
eastoak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2011, 06:41 PM   #24
eastoak
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: oakland, california
Posts: 3,138
Liked 143 Times on 135 Posts
Likes Given: 79

Default

this is the first batch of beer where i saw no krausen at all. there is a thin ring of green (hop?) residue right at the top of the beer and that's it. the only thing i did differently is use fresh orange zest so i wonder if the oils prevented the krausen from forming? i'm not worried about the forming or non forming of krausen as it relates to fermentation but the science behind it forming or not. the gravity of the wort before i pitched the yeast (3/11/11) was 1.045 and the reading this morning (3/14/11) was 1.020 so it's moving along.

6 lb torrified wheat
4 lb german pils
.5 lb acid malt (i forgot about another lb i had)
1.3 lb oat flakes

1 oz german saphir 3.7% 60 min
1 oz greman saphir 3.7% 5 min

at flame out for 5 min:
zest of 4 medium/small oranges
1 oz grains of paradise
1 oz indian coriander (kind of yellow, football shaped)

1 liter wyeast forbidden fruit starter

__________________
eastoak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2011, 07:02 PM   #25
gr8shandini
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Philly
Posts: 782
Liked 52 Times on 40 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by eastoak View Post
. . . an increase in esters and phenols has been shown with open fermentation which is why i decided to see for myself with this experiment.*


disclaimer: i am not an brew scientist or expert just a wacko with a few sacks of grain, a grain mill, brewing equipment, books and some free time. i could be wrong about everything.
Nothing wrong with experimentation. However, I think the increase in esters with open fermentation is in reference to the modern commercial practice of brewing under pressure in a sealed fermenter. If you think about it from a chemical perspective, a yeast cell sitting in a bucket/carboy with an airlock is in a nearly identical environment to one sitting in a truly open fermenter. The only difference would be for an open bucket where the significantly larger surface area might lead to some compounds evaporating off. However, since you're trying to increase the amount of "other" compounds in your beer, that doesn't seem like an asset.

I don't know about your setup (youtube's blocked at work), but my favorite "fermentation corner" happens to be in the basement where the spiders, whatever little bugs they're eating, dust from dryer lint, and countless other contaminants abound. I feel better having a lid on it, but if going "naked" works for you, have at it.
__________________
gr8shandini is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2011, 07:13 PM   #26
Hethen57
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 131
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

If it gets all infected and vinegary...just put a tea bag in it, call it Kamboocha and give it to a hippy friend

__________________
Hethen57 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2011, 09:23 PM   #27
eastoak
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: oakland, california
Posts: 3,138
Liked 143 Times on 135 Posts
Likes Given: 79

Default

it tastes pretty good so far and it has the color, so far, that i was after. the room it's in does not have any real drafts or HVAC vent, the only real air currents are coming from the crack under the door and whatever comes throught the door when i open it. it's covered up now since my intention was to have it open only during the vigorous fermentaion period and that appears to be over. my next open fermentation batch will be a hefeweizen and i'm trying to get a wide, shallow vessel to ferment in which is what was traditionally used.

__________________
eastoak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-15-2011, 01:00 PM   #28
theredben
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Langley, BC
Posts: 934
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gr8shandini View Post
The way I see it, an airlock is already essentially open fermentation. 1" of water is .036 psi. I doubt the yeast can tell the difference between 14.7 and 14.736 psi. So unless you're trying to introduce something wild (or are using 3 feet of water in your blowoff bucket), there's really no reason to change the standard process.
The difference in "open" fermentation is not the removal of pressure, instead it is the natural gas exchange which changes the dissolved oxygen content in the fermenting beer. The theory is that this extra available oxygen allows the yeast to produce compounds they would not normally produce in standard oxygen-deficient beer conditions.
__________________
theredben is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-15-2011, 03:19 PM   #29
aaronkaz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 33
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Some Open Ferment Shots

the start of active fermentation - mostly just foam but looks really neat, almost like an aerial view of mountains. The darker stuff is trub that can be skimmed off....



peak primary ferment - the krausen is about 2 inches thick


close of up krausen


near the end of primary - krausen is much thinner, but is a thick cake floating on top still

__________________

I Love Microbes!

aaronkaz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-15-2011, 03:34 PM   #30
wedge421
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
wedge421's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Posts: 955
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I would be way to nervous to try this. Knowing my luck it would get infected the first day. Oh well. Let me know how it comes out if you do it



__________________

The Best Homebrew and Beer Review VIDEOS on the internets:
http://www.youtube.com/user/BeerGeekNation
Buy Beer Geek Nation shirts - http://www.beergeeknation.com/store

wedge421 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
open fermentation in the backyard? davefleck Lambic & Wild Brewing 7 11-01-2009 12:44 PM
Open fermentation soontobepcv General Techniques 1 11-30-2008 07:23 PM
Have you done open fermentation?? kidfromkanada General Techniques 2 11-25-2008 04:47 PM
Open Air Fermentation- ever tried it? kaj030201 Recipes/Ingredients 3 02-01-2008 03:38 AM
Open vs Closed Fermentation Sigafoos Equipment/Sanitation 4 08-22-2007 10:29 PM