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Old 02-06-2013, 02:25 AM   #21
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I think you might have too much trub if it is an all gain batch
Trub schmub...It all settles very nicely in 7-10 days, rack to a keg or bottle, and chill, chill and chill, nice clear beer will result...brew on!
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:20 PM   #22
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I've been doing this for the past couple batches and it's worked out great so far. I have a pot very similar to the OP's with the temp. probe hole and I usually stuff a piece of plastic wrap in there to prevent any dust from coming in.

Otherwise I let the wort boil for 10 minutes with the lid on to sanitize. I wrap the lid with plastic wrap and let the wort cool overnight and aerate/pitch in the morning.

In fact, I have 1.5 gallons of 1.107 barleywine fermenting in a small stock pot right beside 3.5 gallons of APA in my bigger brew pot.

Check garage sales for cheap pots large and small.

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Old 02-06-2013, 03:37 PM   #23
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Mike37 - do you have any problems with oxidation due to cooling slowly overnight? I suppose if you finish the boil with the lid on and don't take it off, there isn't enough oxygen to really oxidize anything, no matter how slowly you cool it.

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Old 02-06-2013, 03:43 PM   #24
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No oxidation at all. The plastic wrap forms a seal as the wort cools, preventing any outside air from being sucked in.

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Old 02-06-2013, 03:47 PM   #25
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OK, I'm sold. I'm going to give this a shot next brew. Thanks!

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Old 02-06-2013, 03:57 PM   #26
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Mike37 - do you have any problems with oxidation due to cooling slowly overnight? I suppose if you finish the boil with the lid on and don't take it off, there isn't enough oxygen to really oxidize anything, no matter how slowly you cool it.
Oxygen is good at this time. The yeast need it to reproduce. That's why you aerate the wort, to introduce oxygen for the yeast. It's only bad AFTER fermentation has started.
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Old 02-06-2013, 04:01 PM   #27
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Oxygen is good at this time. The yeast need it to reproduce. That's why you aerate the wort, to introduce oxygen for the yeast. It's only bad AFTER fermentation has started.
It was my understanding that oxygen was also bad in the cool down from the boil. You want to oxygenate after it has cooled to pitch temperature, not while it is still hot.
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Old 02-06-2013, 04:09 PM   #28
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It was my understanding that oxygen was also bad in the cool down from the boil. You want to oxygenate after it has cooled to pitch temperature, not while it is still hot.
In before Revvy, HSA (hot side aeration) is a myth on the homebrew scale. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/hot-...m-idiot-71873/ No worries.
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Old 02-06-2013, 04:30 PM   #29
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Well, even so, the fact is that cold liquids absorb gas better than hot liquids (same reason why you want to force-carb while chilled). Aerating while hot isn't going to get nearly as much oxygen into the wort. Any degree of oxidation is not going to improve that either.

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Old 02-06-2013, 11:49 PM   #30
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Actually, I have been doing some priming sugar calculations and the NB Fizz Drops may not be the hottest thing to use for this, which may complicate my 1-pot idea.

I show each Fizz Drop is 4.25 g (not sure whether sucrose or dextrose). From most of the calculators that I have seen, for an American ale, I only want about 2.0-2.2 g of sucrose per 12 oz. bottle for proper carbonation (~1/2 tsp table sugar per bottle).

I may try putting 1/2 tsp of table sugar in each bottle so I can still bottle straight from the pot. There will be some variability but I think I'd prefer that to Champagne-like carbonation.

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