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Old 01-01-2013, 05:48 PM   #11
Bradinator
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I no-chill almost exclusively now and well over 20+ batches and none to ill effect. Basically as soon as I flame out, I place the lid on my boil pot, close it shut with alligator clips and leave it until its cool enough to move to the primary. That usually takes 16-24 hours depending on the ambient temperature. I would say try it, because once you no-chill and may never go back.

Side note: Its winter now and it can get wickedly cold here in Calgary so I have also done a 'no-chillish' outside. Mind you that is NOT in the snow, but in the open on deck table with a -30C wind chill. Cooled down to pitching in less then 4 hours.

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Old 01-01-2013, 06:08 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfman_48442 View Post
I've done just what you suggested twice; no chill into stainless cornies, drop those into the chest freezer, wait until they get to pitch temp.
It worked but the compressor was working HARD for way longer than it should and got insanely hot.
I imagine doing that more than a few times will destroy your refrigeration unit.

I don't know if it gets cold in South Africa, but if I no chill now, it's only in the winter and I leave the cornies in the garage over night, then put em in the fermentation chamber to get to pitch temp.
I just place my corny on my basement floor with a fan blowing across the keg. It is at pitching temps w/in 24 hrs. (Usually in 18 hrs.)
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:22 PM   #13
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I've no-chilled several times while leaving the wort in the kettle like others have already stated. I gathered 2 plastic jugs and haven't even tried them yet. Just more equipment to clean, and those won't be as easy to clean as my kettle. The only issue I think I have with the process is my beers are a bit hazy.

Bradinator, have you done any IPAs this way? Any change in your process to do so? I moved my 45 minute bittering hops to 25 minutes and late hops were used for dryhopping. Turned out nice (Zymurgy Two-Hearted Ale clone) despite the haze.

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Old 01-02-2013, 07:03 PM   #14
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I do my IPA's the same way I do any other beers and let them sit overnight in the kettle. I feel the same way about moving my wort to much and the extra cleaning for the chill-cubes so I don't bother. As for hop schedules, I do some with the altered times and some without but to be completely honest I really don't see any difference. I even did a IIPA which I no-chilled and found that it had all the hop flavour I would have expected from it.

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Old 01-03-2013, 12:34 PM   #15
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Thanks for the feedback. Having moved my bittering hops later in the boil and having some amount of utilization during the no-slow-chill process, I certainly get the appropriate bitterness in my opinion, even on a beer that I achieved 8 more points in gravity. What is interesting is that I get a good amount of hop flavor. Now whether that is from the adjusted 10 minute hops, and extended chill time, or from the dry hops, I'm puzzled. It has me wondering how much I get from very late hopping (10-0 minutes) when I cool with my immersion chiller.

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Old 01-03-2013, 06:48 PM   #16
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I've done several no chill batches as well. I transfer the boiling wort to a keg for 1-7 days depending on how busy I am. I have not noticed any differences when comparing to the same beers I've made with the standard chilling methods.

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Old 01-03-2013, 09:13 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbehr
I've done several no chill batches as well. I transfer the boiling wort to a keg for 1-7 days depending on how busy I am. I have not noticed any differences when comparing to the same beers I've made with the standard chilling methods.
1 to 7 DAYS?
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:07 PM   #18
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1 to 7 DAYS?
Yep, I've let the wort sit for up to a week on a couple occasions. I got busy doing whatever and didn't get my starter going on time. The keg was sealed and purged with c02 so no danger of infection. I've read people keeping wort for months before pitching the yeast. Proper sanitation is key of course!!!
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:34 PM   #19
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1 to 7 DAYS?
Australian no-chillers have been known to package their wort into those water cubes and store them for weeks/months. Apparently they also sell pre-packaged wort in this format.

Seriously people, read the linked thread about no-chill brewing...ALL of this stuff has been hashed and rehashed there. This is a well established way of brewing for alot of people.
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:37 PM   #20
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I guess I don't get how chilling is stressful. that's probably the least stressful part of my brew day.

Flame out, put the lid on, carry the brew pot in to the basement, put sanitized chiller in the pot and turn on the water.

I use this time to clean up, sanitize equipment and get my yeast ready to go. I'll give the brew pot a nudge here and there to move the liquid around.

This is also a great time to do any transferring of previous batches to keg or secondary.

Then I'll make a sandwich and pour a fresh cold beer.

by this time It's usually down to below 90 degrees. Once in the carboy and topped off, its at pitching temp. I pitch my yeast, shake, drop on the air lock and walk to the bar for a beer and a burger.

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