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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > My Imperial stout is thick....
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Old 02-24-2011, 02:56 AM   #11
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Sounds wonderful!

Not too far from my Double W IS. It takes a bit of age, but it'll be fine for sure.
What's your recipe for your Double W IS?
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Old 02-24-2011, 03:08 AM   #12
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Yeah, the lactose is overkill.

Other than that, this looks pretty good!

What was the mash temp?

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Old 02-24-2011, 05:55 AM   #13
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2 lbs rolled barley
Do you mean flaked barley here? Because they roll the flaked barley to flatten it out right? Or more likely roasted barley? Correct?

It sounds great to me I love thick stouts. With that much lactose I would call it an Imperial milk stout though. Still sounds yummy.
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Old 02-24-2011, 02:36 PM   #14
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How many IBUs? I agree that the lactose was overkill, it would probably still be almost as sweet without it (lactose isn't that sweet to begin with) but it wouldn't be as thick/syrup-y. It takes a lot of IBUs to balance all the sweetness.

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Old 02-25-2011, 03:28 AM   #15
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yes, i meant flaked barley, (which happens to be rolled, that's why i was thinking that). Mash temp hovered around 160ish; it's difficult to maintain in the dead of winter in MD.

Yeah it's definitely an imperial milk stout, which was my intention. It would be sweet w/o the lactose, but nothing like this, you can definitely tell there's an eff-load of lactose in it.

call me a dummy/novice/whatever, i don't care, but i haven't ever really paid too much attention to the IBUs, i just add the hops and forget about it (not really a hoppy guy). don't get me wrong, i know the specs, but i just say, ok whatever, lets makes some damn beer. The AA on horizon is like 16%, so i figured it would be a good counterblend for all this intense malty/lactose sweetness. it kinda gave it a bitter-sweet taste (well, not kinda, that's exactly how i would describe it. it's at the end of both spectrums)

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Old 02-25-2011, 01:00 PM   #16
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That's incredible attenuation with a mash temperature of 160!

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Old 02-25-2011, 10:46 PM   #17
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That's incredible attenuation with a mash temperature of 160!
Incredible good or incredible bad? What should the temp be? I always try for 158 but I'm just using a brew sculpture and like I said, its the dead of winter in MD and its difficult to maintain a constant mash temp
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Old 02-25-2011, 11:14 PM   #18
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Incredible good or incredible bad? What should the temp be? I always try for 158 but I'm just using a brew sculpture and like I said, its the dead of winter in MD and its difficult to maintain a constant mash temp
I never go above 156 until mashout. Most of my beers live around 149-151F. 160 is my mashout temp before sparging.
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Old 02-26-2011, 12:45 AM   #19
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That's incredible attenuation with a mash temperature of 160!
You got 70.2% attenuation. American ale yeast WLP060 is rated at 72-80%. Considering you mashed at 160 and you added a bunch of lactose to get the high FG you got, I would say teh attenuation is on the high side of what the yeast is capable of which in this case is a very good thing. So you got lucky .

So the deal with a 160 mash is that you will have more body and more residual sweetness left after fermentation is complete.

This beer is going to be very sweet and thick due to both the 160 and the lactose you added. Most beers this big are hard to get down to a low FG. You will prob end up around 1.030 assuming you have good aeration and some strong yeast.

EDIT: I'M AN IDIOT!!! ksbrain IS SMART!!

Not sure what I was thinking. Yeah 1.034 is a pretty high FG. Looks like you did pretty well, but yeah. It will stay thick and what not. I dont bottle, for some reason in my head i thought it was fermenting in the bottles. I'm stupid.
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Old 02-26-2011, 03:56 AM   #20
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yeah, i hydrated a packet of Safale US-05 american ale yeast and added it to the carboy 2 days b4 bottling (JIC the original yeast was down for the count and/or to help it out, since it's 10.5%).

I feel obligated to bottle this b/c it's an IS. I can't exactly sit a keg in the corner of my basement for 6 months and crack it open every once in a while like i can with the bottles.

What's the difference if i mash at 160 or 150? not being a JA, i'm asking. b/c most of the recipes i use call for 155-160. Sometimes i sparge even higher....like 180. call me crazy, but i like the results.

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