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Old 01-12-2013, 06:51 PM   #1
GaryWJ
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Default Mixing Wort/Aging

First, I am relatively new to brewing. In fact I've never tasted my own brew yet. But that doesn't keep me from wondering a few things. After countless hours of videos and reading on the forums I have yet to come across somebody that has mixed worts. Maybe it's just not feasible..but it seems to me the Sam Adams Utopias are something of this nature.

First. I have two batches fermenting right now, a wheat ale, and an IPA. They are both about done fermenting. What would happen if I were to rack them both into one secondary at this point? Better yet..what would happen if I dropped say 5 grams of candied sugar into this 1 gallon concoction, let it sit for three days. And maybe then after that boil up another batch of wort of a different kind of beer mixed it in with that stuff and pitched yeast onto that and let it ferment out? Then rack it into another vessel and let it mature for a week? What if I were to keep doing this until I had 10 different types of beer mixed together (being very very very careful about contamination), and then I bottle it and let it sit for a year in the dark before trying it?

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Old 01-12-2013, 06:55 PM   #2
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P.S. I'm not so concerned about taste as much as I am about creating something completely unique. I can learn to appreciate just about any taste.

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Old 01-15-2013, 08:50 PM   #3
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My guess is that one year from now you would have a bunch of stale, shitty beer.

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Old 01-15-2013, 08:59 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryWJ View Post
P.S. I'm not so concerned about taste as much as I am about creating something completely unique. I can learn to appreciate just about any taste.
Only one way to find out...
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Old 01-15-2013, 09:07 PM   #5
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Go to the store buy a dozen different styles of beer. Pour them together into a bucket and taste. Lighter beers would disappear. The color would likely be something in the mid-range brown. Hops bitterness would be there, but the flavor and aroma would be as discernible as a field of mixed up weeds. The harsher things would overpower the milder things, but the mild stuff would muddle the stronger things. In other words you'd have a bunch of sh*tty beer.

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Old 01-15-2013, 09:43 PM   #6
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blending is done, but it's fairly rare. much more typical is to brew the beer you want from the outset. for example, your mix of wheat beer and IPA would result in some sort of a pale ale... so why not brew a pale ale with some wheat in it? why go through all the trouble of doing two batches, when you could have achieved the same thing in one step?

all these steps of mixing and transferring also increase your chances of oxidation. be prepared for some of your beer to taste like cardboard.

you haven't yet completed a batch and you're already imagining all these crazy advanced techniques... this probably isn't what you want to hear, but: learn to walk before you try to run. your enthusiasm is awesome however you're currently suffering from something that most new brewers go through: kitchensinkitis, the desire to throw anything and everything into beer and/or use every technique under the sun in hopes of making something new and unique. i suspect that no one is going to talk you out of it, but be ready for failures along with whatever wins you might get.

good brewers don't randomly toss a bunch of ingredients into a pot, then blend with some other kaleidoscopic beer, and hope to get something good. they start with a plan, and based on experience have an idea what to expect. more often than not they choose what they will highlight. you can't highlight everything.

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Old 01-15-2013, 09:43 PM   #7
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"I'm not so concerned about taste as much as I am about creating something completely unique."

Its a great spirit brother, and believe me, everyone on this board has been there. More often than not its a hard lesson well learned. My best advice for you is to learn to perfect traditional styles and then you can begin to really understand how to purposefully create something unique.

However, No one here would be opposed to finding out what happens if you do it! So,...

Just be prepared if it sucks, and then drink it even if it does.

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Old 01-16-2013, 11:23 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Shinglejohn View Post
"I'm not so concerned about taste as much as I am about creating something completely unique."

Its a great spirit brother, and believe me, everyone on this board has been there. More often than not its a hard lesson well learned. My best advice for you is to learn to perfect traditional styles and then you can begin to really understand how to purposefully create something unique.

However, No one here would be opposed to finding out what happens if you do it! So,...

Just be prepared if it sucks, and then drink it even if it does.
We all start with this "this much is good, more must be better" idea. Everyone starting brewing wants to either make the highest alcohol brew, the biggest hop bomb, or--like the guy I met at the LHBS the other day--something that blends all the grains in the shop. In time, as we try these and realize we not have to either drink 5 gallons of the most horrid stuff we can imagine we usually return to the old tried and true. With the OP suggestion though, you would have what would probably be a couple barrels of swill to try to drink.

Go for it, though.
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Old 01-16-2013, 12:55 PM   #9
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Kind of in the same realm of the OP's question: Does anybody here blend the same beers into larger containers(either due to size limitations or taste consistency).

Let's say I brewed a 2.5 gallon batch of all grain beer, pitched, and fermented in a 6 gallon better bottle. The following week, I brewed the same beer, and added the wort to the fermentor. Age for 4 weeks after the second wort was added.

Thus could be scalable to any size, or as many installments of wort you wanted.Would you re-pitch yeast on each installment?

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Old 01-16-2013, 01:23 PM   #10
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IMO I would first find beers that compliment each other and try mixing those like Mississippi Mud mixes pilsner and porter together and is pretty good but a bunch of random beer in a big bucket would probably be really bad

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