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Old 05-27-2011, 04:11 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FireRescueFL View Post
This is EXACTLY the post I was about to type.

So the consensus is that it is safe to add near boiling water to the mash and stir to get the mash to ~168* and from there recirculate to clear any small hunks, and then fly sparge with 170* water to maintain that temp until you reach your boil volume? Then just waste the remaining water from the MLT that doesn't make it to the brewpot?

---Chris
Yup.

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Old 05-29-2011, 06:23 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FireRescueFL View Post
This is EXACTLY the post I was about to type.

So the consensus is that it is safe to add near boiling water to the mash and stir to get the mash to ~168* and from there recirculate to clear any small hunks, and then fly sparge with 170* water to maintain that temp until you reach your boil volume? Then just waste the remaining water from the MLT that doesn't make it to the brewpot?

---Chris
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Originally Posted by wildwest450 View Post
Yup.

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Too add to this. I believe the reason it is ok to add this very hot water before doing your first run off is because the ph of the mash is still low enough to suppress any tannins from leaching into your mash.

I believe on an episode of Brew Strong someone called in with a question regarding this section of "How to Brew" and JP and JZ went on to clarify that mash ph was more important than temp when talking about tannins.
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Old 05-29-2011, 06:50 PM   #53
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It'll make lautering a little easier and it kills the enzymes so that your wort doesn't continue to get more and more fermentable.

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Old 01-26-2013, 09:12 AM   #54
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I've done about 12 AG batches and I batch because its just easier. I use a coleman cooler to mash and gravity to collect the wort (no pumps or anything and no re-circulation). I've never done a mash out but am interested in doing so because I notice my FG is almost always a bit lower than in should be. I'm assuming from what I've read that its because the enzymes keep working when I'm collecting the first runnings. So my question is, if you wanna mash out after your 60 minute or 90 minute mash, do you just drizzle your 180F - 190F mash out water on top of the current water level and just leave it when your draining, or do you mix it in? I can't imagine you would mix the mash out water in because it can disturb the grain bed BUT if you don't mix in the hot mash out water, the hot water might not reach all the grain/sugar and make the mash more fluid and denature all the enzymes to stop sugar breakdown. How do you guys do it?

Thanks

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Old 01-26-2013, 10:09 AM   #55
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If you just want to pour it in (batch sparge), your supposed to mix up the grain bed, the. Let it sit for another 10 minutes or so, collect your runnings u tip they are clear so the grain bed settles ( about a pitcher full) then just collect the rest in your boil kettle. That is the way I do it, works great with efficiency

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Old 01-26-2013, 10:32 AM   #56
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Thanks RUNningonbrew. Ok, so let met just check this again. I just mash as normal (for 60 minutes or however long the recipe calls for) then add the mash out water and mix everyting up good and proper, let it sit for 10 minutes to allow the grain bed to settle and in order to denature the enzymes and liquify the sugar some more.

Then I just go on as usual, clearing the wort and settling the grain bed some more with the pitcher (thats how I usually do it). Is this right? I basically want to do batch sparging with a mash out step.

Thanks

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Old 01-26-2013, 10:35 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frikkieman
Thanks RUNningonbrew. Ok, so let met just check this again. I just mash as normal (for 60 minutes or however long the recipe calls for) then add the mash out water and mix everyting up good and proper, let it sit for 10 minutes to allow the grain bed to settle and in order to denature the enzymes and liquify the sugar some more.

Then I just go on as usual, clearing the wort and settling the grain bed some more with the pitcher (thats how I usually do it). Is this right? I basically want to do batch sparging with a mash out step.

Thanks
Once you fine tune this process calculate your actual efficiency and adjust your recipe to hit your OG.
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Old 01-26-2013, 12:45 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frikkieman View Post
I can't imagine you would mix the mash out water in because it can disturb the grain bed BUT if you don't mix in the hot mash out water, the hot water might not reach all the grain/sugar and make the mash more fluid and denature all the enzymes to stop sugar breakdown. How do you guys do it?

Thanks
I don't believe the grain bed can be disturbed at this point in the process because it hasn't been "set". Draining your grains is what "sets" the bed, and you don't do that until after mash-out.

I batch sparge with a mash-out, and I usually wait 5-10 minutes after mash-out, but I'm waiting for the heat to fully diffuse more than anything to happen with the grain.

At least that's my understanding.
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:20 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frikkieman
Thanks RUNningonbrew. Ok, so let met just check this again. I just mash as normal (for 60 minutes or however long the recipe calls for) then add the mash out water and mix everyting up good and proper, let it sit for 10 minutes to allow the grain bed to settle and in order to denature the enzymes and liquify the sugar some more.

Then I just go on as usual, clearing the wort and settling the grain bed some more with the pitcher (thats how I usually do it). Is this right? I basically want to do batch sparging with a mash out step.

Thanks
Correct, you got it
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:59 PM   #60
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Thanks a bunch guys, your responses really cleared some things up. I always read comments from people who mash out but use fly-sparging technique to sparge after mash-out. It's good to read replies from brewers who mash out and batch sparge, like I want to do. I'm looking forward to my next brew and will most certainly be mashing out

Thanks

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