Last days to enter the BrewHardware Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Making salty beer on purpose
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-08-2014, 06:29 PM   #11
Rkoory
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Jefferson City, Missouri
Posts: 41
Default

Salting the finished beer is fine as a last resort, but it’s a bit ham-fisted for my preference. I was hoping to find more of a brewing technique that results in a salty tone to the beer.

I don't need the end product to be a pretzel, so a huge salty presents is not really sought after.

I know that oyster stouts gets a salty tone from the use of oysters. Also I like the idea of gose, but the sour tones from the yeast sounds like it might not work out.

Anyone ever brew either of these? I wonder if it’s possible to do a gose without the sour notes?

__________________
Rkoory is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-08-2014, 06:39 PM   #12
TheCanisDirus
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 195
Liked 34 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Breakside did a salted carmel stout using...

Grain:
Two Row, Chocolate, Roasted Barley, CaraMunich, Flaked Barley

Hops:
Newport hops

Adjuncts:
Fleur de sel, caramelized lactose and salted caramel


Add some cocoa nibs/powder and you've got a solid start.

__________________
TheCanisDirus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-08-2014, 06:51 PM   #13
satph
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: , NY
Posts: 148
Liked 22 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

I would take the salt additions from a Gose as a starter for your salt additions to the salted chocolate caramel beer. This one calls for 1oz per 5 gallons. This one 14 grams for 5 gallons (half as much as the first). Both call for the addition at 5 minutes left in the boil. The recipes advise you to add salt to taste at bottling if necessary. As a bigger beer, stout might need more salt to taste moderately salty, but I'd rather have too little salt vs too much.

__________________
satph is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-08-2014, 06:53 PM   #14
Rkoory
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Jefferson City, Missouri
Posts: 41
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCanisDirus View Post
Breakside did a salted carmel stout using...

Grain:
Two Row, Chocolate, Roasted Barley, CaraMunich, Flaked Barley

Hops:
Newport hops

Adjuncts:
Fleur de sel, caramelized lactose and salted caramel


Add some cocoa nibs/powder and you've got a solid start.

Hmm, this sounds promising.

It’s funny, it seems like there is no real "New Ground" to be traversed in beer making.
__________________
Rkoory is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-09-2014, 12:06 AM   #15
GuldTuborg
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: OH
Posts: 3,379
Liked 422 Times on 305 Posts
Likes Given: 232

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rkoory View Post
It’s funny, it seems like there is no real "New Ground" to be traversed in beer making.
There's plenty of new ground to travel and trailblazing to be done. But if you want a salty beer, I'm not sure too many have ventured beyond the obvious "add salt" option at some point in the process. Nothing else quite tastes like salt.

It kinds strikes me like asking how to make a malty beer without malt.
__________________

Don't worry, be hoppy.

GuldTuborg is offline
progmac Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-12-2014, 03:12 PM   #16
Rkoory
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Jefferson City, Missouri
Posts: 41
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GuldTuborg View Post
It kinds strikes me like asking how to make a malty beer without malt.
Agreed.
The no new ground comment was in reference to the slated caramel concept for a beer, not the method for imparting a salty tone. When I set myself to this task I did not expect to find a readymade example of a salted caramel beer.

Obviously the addition of salt to the beer will be the way in which the salty characteristic will be imparted. I was just looking for a more novel method than just the direct addition of salt.
__________________
Rkoory is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-12-2014, 09:52 PM   #17
strambo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 598
Liked 50 Times on 41 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

I've had the Breakside salted caramel stout, the salt was pretty subtle. I would just add some salt at bottling/kegging also, not sexy, but what else would be that would give the right flavor?


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew

__________________
strambo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First attempt at adjusting water= salty beer sv_1 Brew Science 13 05-02-2011 12:12 AM
Salty Beer Issue Beer_Guy Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 11-17-2010 04:26 PM
Screwed the water adjustment, now beer is super salty ReverseApacheMaster Brew Science 34 04-18-2010 12:56 AM
Making vinegar - on purpose Sybil Recipes/Ingredients 6 01-14-2010 03:13 AM
HELP, my beer tastes salty! jmo88 General Beer Discussion 10 11-23-2009 09:59 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS