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Old 09-09-2014, 02:02 AM   #21
royal1911
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Well I just tried a sample of my Bo pils and it's great! I'm in schedule to keg on Wednesday morning. Thanks to brulosopher for giving us the tools for making a great beer!

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Old 09-09-2014, 05:18 PM   #22
MikeInMKE
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How necessary is it to "remove probe from side of fermentor so it measures ambient temp inside chamber"????

I ask because I've been using a friend's garage refrigerator for fermenting lagers, controlled with an STC-1000 with custom firmware and might not get a chance to get to her refrigerator on day 5 in order to remove the probe.

FWIW, the ramping steps for that custom firmware to achieve your schedule are:
SP0 50, dH0 120
SP1 50, dH1 48
SP2 65, dH2 72
SP3 65, dH3 84
SP4 30, dH4 0

I'd love to drop off a carboy/bucket and mason jar of yeast, run a profile to ramp the wort to pitching temp, pitch the yeast, change the STC-1000 to the above lagering profile, and be able to ignore it until it has been cold crashing for a few days and I can get to it with a clean keg.

Thanks.

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Old 09-09-2014, 05:36 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeInMKE View Post
How necessary is it to "remove probe from side of fermentor so it measures ambient temp inside chamber"????
from the comments section

Quote:
This is a question I’ve actually gotten a few times, a good one, indeed. My thinking in having the probe measure ambient is that it wouldn’t take as long for ambient to get to the target temp, meaning the beer would actually cool more slowly than if the probe was attached to the fermenter. I hope that makes some sense. Basically, with the probe attached to the fermenter, the freezer would continuously run until the beer was the target temp, which takes considerably longer. Anyway, I’ve actually done it both ways with no ill effect, I just prefer the ambient approach. Cheers!
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Old 09-09-2014, 06:23 PM   #24
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This is a pretty good example of a, modern lager fermentation schedule.


BUT there's a couple slight differences between commercial accelerated lager fermentations and home brew fermentations:

  • Diacetyl- Breweries who do accelerated lager fermentations most certainly monitor diacetyl precursors (vicenal diaketones VDK) very carefully so that they KNOW when the diacetyl precursors are gone. Home brewers should perform a "VDK force test" to ensure that diacetyl has actually been reduced because it is not possible to taste the diacetyl precursors (VDK). -Heat up a small sample of beer for 10 minutes, chill it back down to drinking temperature and THEN taste for diacetyl. The precursors will form actual diacetyl that you can taste faster at higher temperatures and in the presence of oxygen.
  • Diacetyl- Commercial breweries who perform accelerated lager fermentations often use an enzyme that prevents the formation of diacetyl entirely. Commercial breweries are always using the same lager strain and know its behavior well; home brewers dont' always have the luxury and there ARE strains that simply take up diacetyl far slower than others. Pitching enough healthy yeast, and pitching at lower temperatures will help, but the added insurance of diacetyl-converting enzymes might not be a bad thing.

    The enzyme is called alpha acetolactate-decarboxylase (ALDC) and it converts the diacetyl pre-cursor alpha acetolactate directly to acetoin, which is what yeast end up converting diacetyl into; this skips diacetyl entirely and avoids the issue. The big brewery commercial products are called Maturex (from Novozymes) and "SEBmature L" from Specialty Enzymes, but I HAVE seen this enzyme available in home brew sizes somewhere called something else... Just can't find it right now...
  • Clarification- Almost all production lager facilities filter their lager, especially when on these accelerated schedules. Filtration can be a good way to get a lager that tastes mature and looks nice and clear on a faster schedule. Adding finings helps, too and TRULY "crash cooling" rapidly and to very low temps can help too. (Buy 4 lbs of dry ice and wrap it in a towel around your corney keg while your lagering fridge is set on the coldest setting; you want to get it to -1 as quick as possible to help shock the yeast into rapid flocculation.)

-Great post and thread, by-the-way.

Edit- The enzyme available to home brewers is called "BioMat DAR" and is available from MidWest.

Adam
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Old 09-09-2014, 06:45 PM   #25
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sounds like a good idea, i'll have to give it try for my next lager in a few weeks time!

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Old Yesterday, 04:11 PM   #26
royal1911
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It's not quite ready but I've never been known for my patience! It's still tastes great!

I had it on 48 hours at 30psi now I've got it set at 20 psi and will bring it down to 15 tonight. I'll let it set for a week and enjoy.

ImageUploadedByHome Brew1410711111.009070.jpg


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