Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Lagering
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-31-2009, 02:16 AM   #1
Seeves1982
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Follansbee, WV
Posts: 46
Default Lagering

When fermenting an all I know you leave the beer in the fermenter until it's done which usually happens within a week. I know you aren't supposed to leave beer in a plastic fermenter for more than 2 weeks because plastic can breath. The part I'm confused on is, when you're lagering are supposed to switch to glass after 2 weeks even if it isn't done? Are you supposed to start with glass and let it finish? or Do lagers still usually finish within 2 weeks anyway? When doing an Ale I usually go one week in a plastic primary then rack into a glass carboy for another 3 weeks. What's a good schedule for a lager?

Thanks,
Mike

__________________
Seeves1982 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2009, 02:21 AM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,886
Liked 4947 Times on 3584 Posts
Likes Given: 1000

Default

For lagers, I like to leave them in primary at 50 degrees until they are 75% of the way to FG, then raise the temperature to the low 60s for a diacetyl rest (if I'm doing one). Then, when the beer has reached FG and the diacetyl rest is over, I rack to the carboy and begin lagering.

I like to lower the temperature 5 degrees per day until I'm at 34 degrees, then I lager for about 6-12 weeks. I learned to lager for one week for each 10 points of OG. So, for a lager with an OG of 1.060, I lager for at least six weeks. Then, I either keg or bottle.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2009, 02:27 AM   #3
Cpt_Kirks
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lakeland TN
Posts: 3,740
Liked 45 Times on 39 Posts

Default

Where did you hear that you shouldn't leave beer in plastic more than two weeks? Not true.

With ales, I just leave them in the fermentation chiller at 62*F for three weeks, then keg.

For lagers, I leave them in the chiller for about 12 days at about 48*F or so, then give it a D-rest, then drop it down to 35*F for a crash cool, then keg it. Stick the keg in the kegerator for six weeks, and you have love in a glass.

__________________
Cpt_Kirks is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-03-2009, 12:15 AM   #4
Bulls Beers
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Bulls Beers's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: , Boston Bomber#1 place of death...
Posts: 3,088
Liked 139 Times on 104 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
For lagers, I like to leave them in primary at 50 degrees until they are 75% of the way to FG, then raise the temperature to the low 60s for a diacetyl rest (if I'm doing one). Then, when the beer has reached FG and the diacetyl rest is over, I rack to the carboy and begin lagering.

I like to lower the temperature 5 degrees per day until I'm at 34 degrees, then I lager for about 6-12 weeks. I learned to lager for one week for each 10 points of OG. So, for a lager with an OG of 1.060, I lager for at least six weeks. Then, I either keg or bottle.
How do you know when the D-rest is over? Do you need to do a D-rest?
__________________

Spezialisiert auf Deutsch Lagerbier...

Bulls Beers is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-03-2009, 01:22 AM   #5
Malticulous
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: St. George Utah
Posts: 4,138
Liked 56 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

With mine I have pitched a good amount of yeast at 55F or lower, let fermentation start at 48 or so and as fermentation progressed let the temp rise to 55F or so. I have done D-rests at higher temps but with the yeast I have used so far I think it's totally unnecessary. I let it hit FG (see FFT) and crash it to near freezing for a week or more then bottle (adding 2-3 grams fresh dry yeast.) Once they are carbed (one week) I will lager them in my beer fridge longer if necessary.

__________________

Malticulous is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-03-2009, 06:36 PM   #6
michael.berta
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 519
Liked 18 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

+1 on Cpt Kirks. A secondary does more harm than good. it's another chance for contamination and oxidation. Also, it's more work. Plus beer likes to sit on the yeast for a little while to clean up it's own byproducts. I think it's actually better for the beer to not secondary. I can't think of one reason to secondary most beers.

If you pitched the right amount of clean healthy yeast you shouldn't have any issues leaving it in the primary until it's completely done with fermentation. Do a D rest, crash cool, keg, lager and then drink.

__________________
michael.berta is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Truncated Lagering...Bottle Lagering? Evan! General Techniques 12 05-17-2009 03:02 AM
Lagering?? thdewitt All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 03-01-2009 08:42 PM
lagering red96jeep Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 02-17-2009 04:31 AM
Lagering in a keg? ChefyTim General Beer Discussion 3 01-27-2009 06:48 AM
Lagering... how to? The Pol General Techniques 15 05-24-2007 04:16 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS