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Old 10-31-2013, 07:43 PM   #11
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When I've used coffee in my stouts I always added the grounds after flameout and then add cold-brewed coffee when kegging or bottling. I've gotten some really nice coffee flavor going this route.

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Old 10-31-2013, 08:07 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NateLTB
When I've used coffee in my stouts I always added the grounds after flameout and then add cold-brewed coffee when kegging or bottling. I've gotten some really nice coffee flavor going this route.
How much do you add for 5 or 6 gallons?

Also, any have anything to say about a 155 mash temp? I might change it to 154, not that it will change much.
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:40 PM   #13
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ivegot2legs Did you brew this batch? I am thinking about picking up a whiskey barrel and giving a KBS clone, something similar to this, a try.

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Old 01-08-2014, 08:48 PM   #14
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I did. I made three 6 gallon batches in two days.

It is still in the barrel right now, but I bottled one to taste it and determine if I needed to add anything during aging. The barely aged bottle was delicious. I will look at my info at home and provide more information later.

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Old 01-08-2014, 08:59 PM   #15
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Cool thanks for the info!

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Old 01-09-2014, 01:03 AM   #16
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So here’s how it all went-

All numbers are in reference to one nominal 6 gallon batch.

My grain bill and hop bill are the same as described above. I changed to a 90 minute boil with an 8 gallon boil volume, this increased the IBU to 72.2.

A few days earlier I started a 5L starter on a stir plate (actually a 2L and 3L). This was supposed to be a good amount for 6 gallons, which I would pitch on day 1, and then it would be active and stepped up for day 2 when I added 12 more gallons.

I used a mash temp of 155F, because, with the Irish Ale yeast, I was aiming for a final gravity of 1.029-1.030 (more on that later).

My mash tun can hold about 23-23.5 lbs of grain while at 1.25qt/lb. So in order to fit this all, I had to mash thick. I had trouble hitting mash temps (too low), but no trouble fitting everything inside. I would add more hot water to account for the temps, and it worked out ok. The last batch I finally aimed high enough with the temps and hit 155 on the first try. My mash calculator and temps are normally spot on.

Mash went fine, I use a 10 gallon cooler. Temp was fine, fly sparge was fine. After collecting about 8 gallons of wort, I was still getting some strong stuff so I started collecting in another pot to make a second runnings breakfast stout (more on that later).

The boil went fine, and I did the small 2 gallons of second runnings on the stove with some spare hops.

I added chocolate paste with 15 minutes remaining (4 oz). Chocolate paste, or chocolate liquor, is just ground cocoa nibs. My girlfriend is a professional chef and got me a bunch, as it is what they use for chocolate flavor. It’s the most chocolate flavor available, with no added fats or butter, other than the fat inherent to cocoa. I never got much chocolate from nibs, so I went with this method. More on how this worked out later.

I made cold brewed coffee with a French press (100g of coarse grounds in 1L of water at room temp for 2-3 days) and added during the wort chilling. I normally only add at bottling, but I thought a bit of bitterness would be ok in this beer, and it adds the safety of pasteurization.

Stuff goes in buckets, yeast it pitched, everything seems ok, but my gravity is low. Really low at 1.088 for 6 gallons, and I normally get very good efficiencies. Clearly the thick mash hurt me, so now I have to make up gravity with the next two batches.

At this point I realize I should have not bothered with a second runnings beer, but tried a longer boil to get the right gravity. I even have a refractometer, but didn’t use it because I’ve never had issues. I used it judiciously for the next batches to calculate volumes and gravities to make sure I could get it right.

For the second and third batches (done at the same time with a friend), I collected extra wort for a longer boil, and collected even more and boiled it without hops or anything, just to get more sugars. I ended up with another 5.5 gallons at 1.112, 5.5 gallons at 1.102, and 1 gallon at 1.195. This brought my mixed gravity to 1.106 for 18 gallons, which seemed pretty good.

After a good fermentation, it was time to add it to the barrel. 13 days got my gravity down to 1.030-1.031, which was ideal. I added a handle of heaven hill (and previously a bottle of Dad’s Hat Rye – the original spirit of the barrel), to keep the barrel wet. Some bourbon was still present in the bottom, but I just left it.

I deliberately aimed high on my final gravity for several reasons. The bourbon would contribute alcohol and reduce gravity. Along with additions of more coffee or chocolate to lower gravity, I thought it was best to aim high.

When adding to my barrel, I came up short of the 15 gallons needed. There was a lot of junk in the bottom of the fermenter. I knew I needed even more than the 15 gallons so I could keep topping the barrel off. So I had to use my second runnings breakfast stout to top it off, because it seems paramount to have a completely full barrel.

After two weeks in the barrel, I bottled one 12 oz bottle for testing. I had some KBS a few days prior, so I had a good reference. The KBS was very heavy on chocolate, and very sweet, with minimal coffee. My bottle had the correct aroma, but less chocolate and sweetness (the ideal amount, in my book) and minimal coffee. Using the chocolate paste finally got me a good chocolate flavor, but it was still less than the ridiculous amount in KBS.

I love coffee, and I wanted more coffee than KBS had, so I made another batch of cold brewed coffee, boiled a bit of chocolate paste in water to add some flavor that will eventually fade, and added about 4 oz of Dad’s Hat Rye that I had. I thought this would provide a better coffee profile, a matching chocolate flavor, and bring the gravity to the right place with some extra bourbon for alcohol, and completed with oak and vanilla from the barrel.

That’s where I’m at now. It’s in the barrel (around 7 weeks now), and I’ll bottle in a few more weeks.

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Old 01-09-2014, 02:26 AM   #17
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This is fantastic information thank you for posting. I think I will be attempting a similar batch once I source a barrel. Do you plan to add more coffee at bottling? Or are you set with the barrel addition.

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Old 01-09-2014, 09:04 PM   #18
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I'm not currently planning on more coffee. Founders describes it as having a hint of coffee, it seems a lot of that comes from the barrel instead of actual coffee.

I think I'll have a moderate coffee taste. Thing is, I really like coffee. So maybe I'll add extra coffee to 20 bottles or so. And another 20 with the maple to make a CBS.

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Old 05-01-2014, 04:06 PM   #19
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How did the CBS turn out for you? I'm looking to do a variation of this soon so it's ready in the colder months, but there aren't many opinions or recipes on CBS out there. I don't have a barrel so I'm looking to add the bourbon, oak cubes, coffee, and maple syrup into the secondary to make sure the maple has time to marry with all the favors.

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Old 05-01-2014, 05:30 PM   #20
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I think soaking oak cubes in bourbon and adding those to a secondary is a good plan.

I would not add coffee beans or grounds to the secondary. It's ok to add some coffee (the liquid) to the end of a boil or to the secondary. It's best to aim low and add more later.

It seems that maple does not contribute much after fermented. Adding it to the secondary won't do much.

After some aging, I recommend bottling one bottle from the secondary, carbing it, chilling it, and drinking it as normal. It's the best way to tell how the flavours are working, and what you need to add more of. Then add appropriately and continue to age.

I use maple syrup as a priming agent for some bottles, and it seems to have worked fine. It still doesn't contribute that much flavour to such a large beer. Maybe if you used it to carb up a hefeweizen, you would notice something.

The maple extract seems to have worked well. I have the exact proportion and product written down, if you want the info.

The bottles with maple extract seem to have carbonated less, or more slowly, than other bottles. I would say normal dextrose primed quickly, maple syrup primed less quickly, maple syrup with maple extract primed the least, or the slowest. Maple extract is mostly alcohol, and while it is a very small amount that is added, it may have had an effect on the yeast, or something. (Also, always add fresh yeast, which was done here.)

However, I did open a few CBS bottles, and poured it well to get a moderate and appropriate head, and it was great. Good maple flavours and it worked well overall.

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