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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Keg Aging Question
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Old 07-05-2012, 12:08 AM   #1
Jaybrew226
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Default Keg Aging Question

Here is what I'm doing and I wanted to bounce it off someone else. I want to brew a 5 gallon batch, keg it in my corny and evacuate the head-space of O2 with my CO2 tank. Leave the beer kegged and pressurized with 12PSI but not under constant pressure from the tank but just letting it come to pressure then removing the gas in line. Then let the beer age in that condition in my keezer.

What I'm worried about it the beer absorbing the CO2 which might cause the lid not to seal properly. Does this sound like something I can do? I've read similar things on the forums but nobody addresses the constant pressure question. I know that some of my keg lids don't seal well unless they are under pressure. Thoughts?

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Old 07-05-2012, 12:54 AM   #2
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It should be fine that way. If you're concerned about the seal, hit it with a 12 psi burst once every 2 weeks or so.

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Old 07-05-2012, 02:22 AM   #3
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Stick dimes under the feet of the lid bail. That will put a bit more "squish" on the big o-ring. Combined with a film of keg lube you can likely get a good seal even after any CO2 in the head space dissolves...

Cheers!

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Old 07-05-2012, 02:32 AM   #4
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You can also attach a 0-30 psi gauge using tubing onto a corny gas-in fitting. Hit the keg with pressure, attach the gauge. If your pressure drops significantly, hit it with some more pressure and repeat.

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Old 07-05-2012, 03:37 PM   #5
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If you shake the beer while its on gas that first time, you can speed things up. I carb my beers as you describe, I think even if the pressure goes to ambient the lid is still providing a barrier to air going in and after a couple of days your keg will maintain some pressure.

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Old 07-05-2012, 09:36 PM   #6
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What you're describing is exactly what I do when I'm out of taps. It's always nice to have kegs ready to carb when the next one runs out.
wildwest450 is spot on.
Even if I'm pretty sure of the seal on the lid I always check the pressure every 10 days or so just to make sure it's still retaining that pressure and then hit it again with 15psi just in case any has been absorbed.
I can't comment on what happens if you just leave it, if it will be completely absorbed etc., as I've never let it sit for more than 10 days before hitting it again.
I might start waiting 14 days with wildwest450's suggestion, because I'm sure the extra 4 days won't matter all that much, I'm probably just being a little anal.

IOW - It should work fine.

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Old 07-07-2012, 02:28 AM   #7
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Exactly what I do. Gotta have the 'on deck' keg when one kicks. If nothing else it's also conditioning a bit before consumption...never a bad thing.

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Old 07-07-2012, 04:23 AM   #8
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thanks for all the great suggestions. So i pressurized the keg to 12PSI and left it in the keezer. At the end of the next day it had some residual pressure but not a ton so I hit it again with the same 12PSI to bring it up. I checked it today and found it had lost most of the pressure. So this time I attached the gas line and cranked it up to 30PSI, which I would think any leaks would become apparent very quickly. Everything seemed fine and no leaks that I can detect. I appears the 12PSI shot is being absorbed fairly quickly. Any thoughts?

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