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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Judges' comments - Creaminess?
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Old 05-14-2013, 10:08 AM   #21
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For the people suggesting I raise my mash temp, you saw that it's a dry stout, right? As it is, my attenuation is barely meeting style. I'm afraid a higher mash temp will leave my FG too high.
Attenuation and mouth feel are two different things. You can have both. Try a batch with a higher mash, you might be surprised.
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Old 05-14-2013, 10:16 AM   #22
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Damn double posts.

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Old 05-15-2013, 02:48 PM   #23
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As for the calcium chloride mash vs boil - the difference comes in because it affects mash pH based on the added calcium- since you're starting with a dark beer and using DI water - you probably aren't needing to lower the mash pH anyway (and may actually need to raise it). the chloride portion that was suggested can be added to any part of the process - even in the finished beer if you want to try it.
Calcium chloride is a bit odd compared to the other salts we use with brewing in that it has no affect on pH. Calcium Carbonate (chalk) and gypsum do because when they dissolve the carbonate and sulfate ions react with H+ ions, which then affects the pH (which is simply the measure of the H+ ion concentration). Neither Ca or Cl react with H+ ions so it does not affect pH. It will certainly affect flavor though, and its addition is good advice to the OP. I've messed around with adding it to pints of porter and a little bit definitely made the beer a little bit fuller and smoother.
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Old 05-15-2013, 05:35 PM   #24
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Calcium chloride is a bit odd compared to the other salts we use with brewing in that it has no affect on pH. Calcium Carbonate (chalk) and gypsum do because when they dissolve the carbonate and sulfate ions react with H+ ions, which then affects the pH (which is simply the measure of the H+ ion concentration). Neither Ca or Cl react with H+ ions so it does not affect pH. It will certainly affect flavor though, and its addition is good advice to the OP. I've messed around with adding it to pints of porter and a little bit definitely made the beer a little bit fuller and smoother.
In pure water this is correct but I thought that if you had high alkalinity the Ca+2 ions from the CaCl2 would bond with some of the carbonate ions from the bicarbonate, thus yielding a more acidic solution?

Ca+2 + HCO3- => CaCO3 + H+

Sorry off topic, I just want to make sure an assumption I've been working off of forever is correct. I believe in a George Fix book he uses this as an example of how much CaCl2 is needed to reduce alkalinity to a desired level (ends up being a lot of salt)... The other way would be to adjust pH manually to change the ratio of bicarbonate to H2CO3.
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Old 05-15-2013, 08:42 PM   #25
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In pure water this is correct but I thought that if you had high alkalinity the Ca+2 ions from the CaCl2 would bond with some of the carbonate ions from the bicarbonate, thus yielding a more acidic solution?

Ca+2 + HCO3- => CaCO3 + H+

Sorry off topic, I just want to make sure an assumption I've been working off of forever is correct. I believe in a George Fix book he uses this as an example of how much CaCl2 is needed to reduce alkalinity to a desired level (ends up being a lot of salt)... The other way would be to adjust pH manually to change the ratio of bicarbonate to H2CO3.
Yeah, if you have highly alkaline water, plus you need the pH to be fairly high to encourage CaC03 to precipitate out. If the pH is low, it won't ppt out as well. This is why it is better to use CaOH (pickling lime) if reducing alkalinity is your goal. Also in the case of the OP's beer, if anything he wants to raise the pH a bit. One can add CaOH to raise the pH, but one has to be more careful as it is much easier to add to much with this salt. It is a great way to do it though.

More chloride ions will help to round out the mouthfeel a bit (assuming Cl is low).
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