Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > IPA aging. Contradictory Information?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-24-2010, 08:14 PM   #21
giligson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Vancouver Area - Canada
Posts: 755
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Brew your IPA
Age moderately (this is TOTALLY a matter of taste and includes many factors including, malts used and OG , ABV etc)
Near the end of aging - dry hop for the best "young hop" flavor.

__________________

We who are about to Brew, salute you!

giligson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2010, 08:20 PM   #22
maida7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 2,817
Liked 44 Times on 38 Posts

Default

IMHO it's better fresh when the hop flavor is at it's peak. I drink my IPA's a soon as I can get them on tap and carbonated. I find that if you let them age, you loose a lot of that bright hop flavor. For me the hop flavor is what makes an IPA so dang tasty.


Nothing you get in the stores is as fresh as an IPA you can make at home. Having fresh IPA at home has changed my whole perception of what is a great IPA.

__________________
maida7 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2010, 09:09 PM   #23
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,654
Liked 135 Times on 128 Posts

Default

I've got some 3 year old IPA Brut that lasted about 8 months before it became a waste of space due to lack of flavor/aroma. A 90 IBU 9.3% ABV Bitter is tough to drink.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2010, 10:44 PM   #24
Zythophile
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: London, England
Posts: 4
Default

Beers that improve with age generally do so not because they're badly made in the first place but because they're the sort of beers that respond well to ageing. Not all beers taste great when they're fresh: generally the stronger, the more they need ageing, to allow harsher flavours to round down.

__________________
Zythophile is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2010, 12:28 AM   #25
stephen424
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Burns Harbor, IN
Posts: 42
Default

I just made an IPA and it sat in the fermentor for a month and then used table sugar to bottle with. For some reason all my beers carb up in a week, with too much head in my opinion. It smelled awesome and tasted good, but it will refine in about a month and I think it will be great.

__________________
stephen424 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2010, 03:29 AM   #26
bwbrewco
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Ca
Posts: 2
Default Mr

IPA's normally have higher alcohol content, thus aging helps flavor profile!!!

__________________
bwbrewco is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2010, 04:39 AM   #27
Brewdouche-RuBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: California, Pennsylvania
Posts: 600
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts

Default Its all relative, and its all good.

I follow a 1,2,3,4 approach so far without fail. For all beers in the 4.5 - 7% abv.

1 week Primary
2 weeks secondary
3 weeks tertiary
4 weeks before sharing

I like someone else who posted dry hop ipa/apa in the keg so that all the hoppy goodness gets jammed into the beer at 12 psi for a week. By doing that I have gotten to taste them over the coarse of 7-10 days before bottling, and feel that all the flavors blend & balance after atleast a month aged.

a week is 7-10 days

__________________

You knuckleheadz are my kinda smacktardZ
#3 DONT be a Brewdouche.
Comprehensive Beer Podcast list.
BasicBrewing
The Brewing Network
Brewdouche-RuBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2010, 04:49 AM   #28
OdinsBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 71
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Age vs fresh, dry hop aroma and 1 minute flavor hops for IPAs

I've done some testing on the age vs. freshness issue.

I have an American IPA "Asgard Ale", and my double IPA "Thor's Hop Hammer".

I see that you have a Pliny Clone going so that's a lot of help on the seeing where you're coming from, assuming you've had real and fresh pliny. Nationally speaking, I think both judges and folks on this forum aren't on the same page about big hop head IPAs. Pliny, "the West Coast" style, clean big , bright hops and low malt, doesn't ship to the east coast specifically because it doesn't age well, and as you'll see on the notes on the keg it says to not age the beer and drink it fresh. So, depending on what type of "big hop flavor" you mean, the answer you're looking for will vary. As a note about my palate, I think dogfish and pliny are completely different types of hoppy beers, though they are often compared. I'm a Pliny fan so read this accordingly...

I was at first able to make a good, dry hopped, 8.1% double IPA with bright, floral aromas and big hop flavor, but flavors and aromas peaked at about 4 weeks. I've even timed my brew and dry hop dates so that judges in competition would drink it at peak flavors. At 6 weeks it started to noticeably loose hop characteristics. After getting pretty happy with my recipe of my double IPA, my next my goal was to create a big hop beer with a longer shelf life.

IMO it's the dry hop that really drops out, and some of the flavor hops drop when you age it. My dry hopped Thor's Hammer which is mash hopped, has 2.5 oz 1min hops, and 6oz of dry hop is best at 4 weeks. For my next beer, one with more shelf life, my idea was to not bother with dry hopping (which can get to be a pain), and instead try just dumping the massive hops into the 1 minute. It's worked for me. It's a different kind of beer but it does have a long shelf life and it's good.

My A IPA is best, rather, only good after it ages about 2 months. It has 4 oz Centennial 10AA of 1min hops. It's pretty bad tasting when it's young. After it mellows it's a good hop oriented beer, but more balanced with the malts, unlike the hop-centric double IPA. It's not a bright, citrusy hoppy beer, but a good A IPA. More of a subtle Racer 5 / Lagunitas.

And to second the sentiment, taste is subjective! Asgard Ale bottle conditioned at 4 or 5 months old, took 1st in A IPAs, and 3rd in IPAs overall at the World Cup of Beer 2010. My Thor's Hop Hammer actually scored higher, but the competition was tougher in the double IPA category and it didn't place. Judges' notes really show how palates differ. Some national judges just didn't like the big hop flavor, while locals loved it. One scored it as a 41. Another said it was too hoppy and not balanced. For me the "off balance" of the big hops and low malts is exactly what I'm going for in a Pliny type double IPA.

Cheer's to having fun brewing gallons and gallons of beer, finding the recipe that you like.

SKOL!

p.s. SAYNOMORE, I haven't tried it yet, but I've had the same thought about aging beer first and dry hopping later. Let me know if you try it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saynomore10 View Post
Here's a thought.
Why not age the beer however long you feel is necessary, let's say two months or so, THEN dry hop as normal and keg or bottle. It seems to me that hop aroma and flavor dissipate with age much more quickly than bitterness anyway. So this way you could still get great aroma and flavor from the dry hopping and keep most of your bitterness, but still get a nice aged and conditioned beer.

What does everyone think about this?
__________________

ODIN'S BREW

OdinsBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2010, 04:38 PM   #29
throwbookatface
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Emeryville, CA
Posts: 169
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by saynomore10 View Post
Here's a thought.
Why not age the beer however long you feel is necessary, let's say two months or so, THEN dry hop as normal and keg or bottle. It seems to me that hop aroma and flavor dissipate with age much more quickly than bitterness anyway. So this way you could still get great aroma and flavor from the dry hopping and keep most of your bitterness, but still get a nice aged and conditioned beer.

What does everyone think about this?
I often thought of this. Hell, how cool would it be to bottle an IPA with one hop blossom sitting at the bottom of the bottle? I may reserve one clear bottle to add this touch one day, just for kicks when giving a bottle to a friend as a gift...
__________________
On Deck: Maple Bacon Porter, Espresso Stout?
Fermenting: Ed Wort's Apfelwein, Coffee Stout
Drinking: Belgian Tripel, Caramel Blonde, a crappy estery IPA that fermented too warm
Enjoying: Lagunitas Lucky 13 Ale, Grand Teton Sweet Grass Pale Ale (a MUST-TRY!), Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout, some Coors Light too.

throwbookatface is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2010, 04:42 PM   #30
Minion
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1
Default

I think the answer you are looking for is tradition. Traditional IPAs were transported by ship from England to India and that travel time took weeks. The addition of a lot of hops was in part to help with preventing the beer from spoiling during the trip. The book you cite is giving you the traditional aging process for an IPA.

__________________
Minion is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Barley wine: Bulk aging vs aging in the bottle jjacobs Recipes/Ingredients 18 12-21-2009 03:01 AM
Secondary fermentation vs bulk aging vs bottle aging jaginger Cider Forum 8 07-09-2009 11:08 PM
Bulk aging or bottle aging for big beers Frost General Techniques 4 11-21-2008 09:44 PM
Is there an advantage of aging in secondary instead of only aging in bottles? polamalu43 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 04-02-2008 01:20 PM
lots contradictory information on brewing emmpeethree Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 11-27-2006 03:56 AM