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Old 04-17-2006, 05:30 PM   #11
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I had an interesting epiphany while 'brewing' a batch of Invert sugar. I noticed that , just before it actually started to boil, it had a foam 'explosion'. Hmmm, I wonder what gas that was?

So, I looked up the formulas for Fructose (C2, H12, O6), Glucose (also C6,H12,O6) and Sucrose ( C12, H12, 011). Hmmm, Sucrose lacks one oxygen. So, to break the chain, you need to uptake an oxygen from somewhere...

My guess is that this chemical reaction would account for the 'cidery taste' of brew using too much Sucrose.... The foam in my Invert batch must have been Hydrogen, from water molecules? Does yeast use up free oxygen to 'invert' the Succose, thereby starving the yeast for oxygen??

Does the presence of Hydrogen make light beer? (joke) Is it more hydrogen that makes cideryness, or less Oxygen?

I do think I'll be making it a practise to use Invert syrup for starting,boosting, and priming. from now on. 40 cents/lb, instead of $2 for corn sugar...

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Old 12-28-2007, 03:27 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by casebrew
My guess is that this chemical reaction would account for the 'cidery taste' of brew using too much Sucrose.... The foam in my Invert batch must have been Hydrogen, from water molecules?
that sounds logical... I've done some searching on this subject:

from Wikipedia (Sucrose): "Acidic hydrolysis can be used in laboratories to achieve the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose."

from Wikipedia (Hydrolysis):"Hydrolysis is a chemical reaction or process in which a chemical compound is broken down by reaction with water"

so I think you guessed right!
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Old 12-28-2007, 03:56 PM   #13
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WOW - how to dig up an old thread.

Check out our Wiki.

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Old 12-28-2007, 04:11 PM   #14
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What is the most available form of citric acid? Should it be at the lhbs?

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Old 12-28-2007, 04:54 PM   #15
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Brewers yeast has invertase - the enzyme needed to break sucrose down into its component (and fermentable) sugars. There is nothing to be gained by making or buying invert sugar.

Any of the darker sugars will add varying amounts of unfermentable sugars and flavour which may or may not be desirable in your beer.

The dreaded cidery flavour imparted by sugar only occurs if it makes up too large a portion of your fermentables. If it is less then 15-20% there shouldn't be any off flavour - it will however result in a noticeably drier beer...

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Old 12-28-2007, 04:56 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon
What is the most available form of citric acid? Should it be at the lhbs?
Lemon juice or cream of tartar
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Old 12-28-2007, 04:57 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orfy
WOW - how to dig up an old thread.

Check out our Wiki.
srsly

year and a half 'tween replies
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Old 12-28-2007, 04:58 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewt00l
Lemon juice or cream of tartar
Makes sense.

Isn't brown sugar slightly caramelized cane sugar?
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Old 12-28-2007, 05:01 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon
Makes sense.

Isn't brown sugar slightly caramelized cane sugar?
molasses + white sugar
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Old 01-04-2008, 01:54 PM   #20
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Here's my question: when a recipe calls for 5% white sugar, does it make a difference whether cane/beet sugar (sucrose) or corn sugar (dextrose/glucose) is used? Does cane sugar have any unique, desirable property at this low proportion? Cost is not a factor, I've got plenty of both...


thanks!

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