Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > How would you go cheap?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-11-2008, 05:39 PM   #21
sirsloop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: South River, NJ
Posts: 2,592
Liked 17 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Harvest and reuse yeast, grow your own hops, and make pale brews. Cider is dirt cheap to make and is usually a hit. Buy in bulk from shops that offer flat rate shipping, or from your LHBS if the prices are reasonable. For example you can usually get a discount on stuff like grain or extract if you get 50lbs of it. It may take a while to use it all up, but if you can knock off .50/lbs thats quite a large overall savings.

__________________
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~___//_ ____________________________~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~_/ [][]| | /```\/```\/```\/```\/```\ |~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~_/_______| |____NOW TRIPLE HOPPED______|~~~~~~~~~~
~~~___/[_]| 00 /| | \,,,/\,,,/\,,,/\,,,/\,,,/ |~~~~~~~~~~
~~|___|___|___/_| |___________________________|~~~~~~~~~~
~~|=(*)[________]==(*)(*)=| \________/=(*)(*)=|~~~~~~~~~~
sirsloop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2008, 05:49 PM   #22
Boerderij_Kabouter
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Boerderij_Kabouter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Oconomowoc, Wisconsin
Posts: 8,461
Liked 120 Times on 104 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

You really have to look at your goals. Brewing your own can be cheap but if you like good beer, you will unavoidably go beyond the $25 starter kit and an enamelware pot. The equipment gets expensive but it is worth it. I definitely make better beer because of my upgraded equipment. That said you CAN buy a $25 starter kit and make beer. This would be an economical way of imbibing alcohol and is a good hobby for college.

That said, once you do have a suitable setup, it is cheaper to brew your own than to buy micros. I brew 10g batches buying all ingredients from my LHBS (not reusing yeast) for ~$60 a batch (normal beer ~1.060 OG).

Give it a go!

Boerderij_Kabouter is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2008, 06:16 PM   #23
BrewDey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 457
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I'd have to agree with most on here that producing quality beer is only one part of the motivation. I enjoy the process as well-and I like to learn and experiment.

A brewer-buddy and I have just gotten into AG, and it has been a lot more fun, and cheaper too. I'd have to admit that a big part of it though is a reason to hang out with friends, shoot the breeze, drink both homebrewed and commerical beer as you work, share tips and advice, listen to music, and basicly just have a good time.

When the day is over, you've got a few batches of beer to show for it. You've also had several hours of enjoyment. I kind of compare it to guys who really like working on their cars-it's more than just the end product. AG requires more time, so you really need to schedule a weekend day (or at least a good chunk of that day). But during the week you can bottle, clean/harvest yeast, make a starter, etc. Re-using yeast and going AG help save $$ and also make it much more of an 'event' IMO.

__________________
BrewDey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2008, 06:23 PM   #24
john from dc
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 395
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by loopmd
thanks, i did do a search and read that thread. i guess i was wondering if there was any step between 3-5 lb bags and 55 lbs.

i have to get packages shipped to my office and commute by bike so 55lbs is pretty much out. also it's only a matter of time before i go all grain so i doubt i'd use all of it.
__________________
john from dc is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2008, 06:34 PM   #25
The Pol
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 11,769
Liked 73 Times on 63 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

I have to say, as another member did... do not buy ingredients at a livestock feed store. Brewing grains are malted and kilned, livestick feed is not. Also, I grew up on a farm, bought alot of livestock feed... even if you did malt it and kiln it, it is cattle feed, it wont make good beer.

__________________
The Pol is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2008, 03:04 AM   #26
artyboy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 266
Default

Of course I value my time. When I'm spending it doing something that I enjoy I value it a lot less than when I'm spending it doing something that I don't want to do. Brewing beer is a lot of fun so I don't really value my time spent doing it. I also realize that part of your cost is tied up in the equipment. The thing about equipment is that once you have it you don't have to pay for it anymore (assuming you don't put it on credit). I already have most of what I need so getting the last few things wouldn't be a big expense.

I don't know how many of you watch the news but our immediate economic future is looking pretty uncertain right now. Putting up enough raw materials to make several batches of beer doesn't seem like such a bad idea. Hops are getting expensive as most of you know (how many of you wish that you would've stocked up a year ago?). Grain prices are also going up. The next couple of years could get a little hairy so I'm just trying to plan ahead where I can. If things get tight around here my beer budget is going to be the first thing that goes away.

__________________
artyboy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2008, 03:38 AM   #27
evermuse
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 12
Default

This whole thread I find 100% confusing. I brew with extract and get a 6 pack in the end, that (I think) is far better than most pricey beers, for about 2 bucks a 6 pack. That's less then I can pay the cheapest macro brew available. Maybe It's just that I'm in Chicago? I've been reusing my yeast as of my second (of 10) batch. I also use plastic, and have a very cheap brew pot. I've seen prices online that I would never pay.I've looked around online and seen all these folks who have spent thousands on homebrew gear, and I even know one here, but I have never felt like homebrewing was out of my reach due to funds. And folks, I don't make much money.

__________________
evermuse is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2008, 06:10 AM   #28
beala
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 145
Likes Given: 2

Default

Economics is an amazing thing. The cost will eventually equalize in the end, unless you really think your process is more efficient than the 100+ gal batches that commercial places can make. As PeteOz77 pointed out, the only way it could really be cheaper is if you live in a place where there are high beer taxes. In the US, this isn't a problem for beer so much as it's a problem for liquor. If you really wanna save money, start distilling. The liquor taxes here in the US are ridiculous, but I guess we're not allowed to talk about distilling here

One case in point: wine kits started getting popular first in canada because the wine taxes were so high. Check the packaging. To this day, many of the wine kit companies are still based in canada.

__________________
beala is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2008, 09:24 AM   #29
Danek
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 1,276
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts

Default

The best way I can think of to go cheap is to find a really good recipe for a relatively low-alcohol, all-grain beer. (And I mean low alcohol as around 4 or 5% ABV - just not an Imperial IPA). Specifically I mean something like Edwort's Haus Pale Ale. With a relatively modest gravity range, you don't need as large a hop-bill to balance the beer, and you don't have to spend much on grain in the first place. I also use dry yeast as it's a quarter the price of liquid, though for people who re-use yeast, that's neither here nor there.

I didn't get into homebrewing to save money, so if I want a big hoppy beer (for example) then I'll pay for the ingredients to get one. But it's also nice to know that if I did want to make savings, then I could make a house beer that's better than, and cheaper than, the stuff in the beer shop down the road.

__________________
Bottle conditioning: Pliny the Elder clone; Tramp's Overcoat Barley Wine
Next up: Vanilla Porter
Danek is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2008, 11:58 AM   #30
capcrnch
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
capcrnch's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Meeeechigan
Posts: 881
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Got Trub?
As I heard on one of the brewing podcasts - it's alot cheaper hobby then buying a bass boat...
On that note.. Going by the old saying.. The 2 happiest days in a boat owners life are the day he buys the boat and the day he sells the boat..
At least with home brewing, you bring yourself joy every couple months at least
__________________
capcrnch is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cheap ale rexbanner Extract Brewing 19 09-29-2009 03:15 AM
BIG BK, Cheap HenryHill Equipment/Sanitation 6 02-18-2008 05:47 PM
Cheap A$$ Joe Dragon General Chit Chat 8 12-06-2007 08:07 PM
i'm cheap robs1642 General Techniques 12 07-24-2007 01:42 AM
New MLT on the cheap BadKarma Kettles, Mash Tuns, & Hot Liquor Tanks 13 06-18-2007 10:34 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS