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Old 11-07-2011, 03:28 PM   #31
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I made a hop tea with my bittering hops on one batch a few months ago. I read that the tea pulls the aroma and flavor out but leaves the bittering portion behind. After the tea steeps for a while, using a french press, press the hops down, keep the tea for a flameout or pre-pitching addition and put the hops in the boil as normal (60 min usually). The beer turned out well, but I would need to perform a control experiment before I could provide any form of empirical conclusions.

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Old 11-08-2011, 04:08 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by carp View Post
FWIW here's what I have been doing. At flameout, turn on the chiller and within about 3-4 minutes I'm down to 180. I stop chilling, add in my 'flameout' hops and let steep for 10 minutes, and then resume chilling, which takes another 15-18 minutes.
I have not done any sort of side-by-side comparison with other methods, but I can say that my beers (all IPAs) have lots of hop flavor and aroma, and people love them.
What's the reasoning behind cooling to 180° before adding the hops?
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Old 11-08-2011, 04:50 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartan1979

What's the reasoning behind cooling to 180° before adding the hops?
I'm not 100% sure and he may have another reason, but i believe adding the hops below 180F will stop isomerization and not extract additional bitterness.

When adding hops at flame out, and letting steep for 30 mins before cooling can almost be considered close to a regular 30 min hop addition adding flavor but also adding significant bitterness.

I assume he chills to stop from adding bitterness, but to continue to add aroma and flavoring from the hops.
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Old 11-08-2011, 04:57 PM   #34
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Cooling to 180 (which is what I do, too) ensures that there is minimal steam coming off of the wort, which will pull the hop aroma away with it.

I typically add a few ounces at 180, mix them up and let steep for about 5-10minutes (as long as it takes to hook up my chiller and get things ready), then wirlpool and chill. I always get huge hop flavor and aroma.

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Old 11-08-2011, 05:08 PM   #35
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Do u cover ur pot after flame out? I do as soon as I kill the flame. This keeps all that aroma in very well.

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Old 11-08-2011, 05:20 PM   #36
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I tend to do a bittering addition and then do a finishing addition at flameout. I add this addition and begin my whirlpool. I run my CFC back to the kettle and chill slowly. Once I hit around 160 I then move my CFC return from the kettle and then move to the fermenter. Total contact time is nearly 30 minutes. I have found I gain some bittering from these hops, but it gives it more of a smoothness vs. a boil addition at 10. As far as aroma, I don't think I get much of the aroma here. Dry hopping and warming my beer to the low 70's during the dry hop gives me the aroma IMO. I made a hopback and couldn't tell a lot of difference, even though it was used only once. I'm doing an IIPA coming up and I'm stuffing the hopback with my homegrown hops. I calculate my whirlpool addition IBU as a 5 min boil addition. Not sure if this is correct, but dat is how I do it. Works for me.

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Old 11-08-2011, 05:37 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartan1979 View Post
What's the reasoning behind cooling to 180° before adding the hops?

I'm probably going to get killed here, but... I've been under the impression that it is good practice to get your wort under 180 ASAP after the boil to limit the production of the precursors of DMS (dimethyl sulfide), and other volatiles that are expelled during the boil but are still produced but trapped at temps above 180ºF

Personally, I have done flame out additions with 20min whirlpool before chilling in the past, but I am currently using my DIY hop back. I find that gravity feeding through the hop back then going directly through my CFC has given me the best aroma. It takes about 15-20min to drain the kettle through the hop back, so I'd consider the contact time to be similar.
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:11 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by Bsquared View Post
I'm probably going to get killed here, but... I've been under the impression that it is good practice to get your wort under 180 ASAP after the boil to limit the production of the precursors of DMS (dimethyl sulfide), and other volatiles that are expelled during the boil but are still produced but trapped at temps above 180ºF

Personally, I have done flame out additions with 20min whirlpool before chilling in the past, but I am currently using my DIY hop back. I find that gravity feeding through the hop back then going directly through my CFC has given me the best aroma. It takes about 15-20min to drain the kettle through the hop back, so I'd consider the contact time to be similar.
I could be wrong, but I think the DMS "danger zone" is between 140 and 180. 140 is the temp you want to get below ASAP, IIRC.
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:12 PM   #39
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I have started doing my 60 minute addition as a FWH and then putting all of the remaining additions into the cube (no-chill). So far this has been used on an ESB, APA, and a dry stout.....very different sort of bittering (much milder than usual) and a HUGE hop aroma/taste. Obviously this is better for certain styles but i am extremely pleased with the results at this point.

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Old 11-08-2011, 06:43 PM   #40
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IMO , you get zero aroma from flameout hop additions after fermentation is complete. The CO2 will drive out most if not all the aroma. You need to dry hop to get good aroma. That being said, you get a lot of the hop flavor from letting flameout steep for a half hour or so.

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