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Old 04-17-2013, 02:30 AM   #221
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Good suggestions! I've been meaning to get a thrumometer. That would make it easier to hit 110 in one drain. I could steep in the bucket and drain the bucket with a spigot through the chiller into another bucket.

Most of the year I can open my BK valve all the way and not adjust the flow of the water and it chills somewhere between 60-65. If the summer is really hot for the entire summer, I open the BK valve about 3/4. If I open it up all the way in the middle of a cold winter, I can chill into the 50s. I just use a little less faucet pressure in that situation. The thrumometer would take the guesswork out of that too.

I'm sold on the thrumometer. Thanks!

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Old 04-17-2013, 06:02 AM   #222
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy_Bugger
Good suggestions! I've been meaning to get a thrumometer. That would make it easier to hit 110 in one drain. I could steep in the bucket and drain the bucket with a spigot through the chiller into another bucket.

Most of the year I can open my BK valve all the way and not adjust the flow of the water and it chills somewhere between 60-65. If the summer is really hot for the entire summer, I open the BK valve about 3/4. If I open it up all the way in the middle of a cold winter, I can chill into the 50s. I just use a little less faucet pressure in that situation. The thrumometer would take the guesswork out of that too.

I'm sold on the thrumometer. Thanks!
The ThruMometer is nice, but it lags the real temp a bit when there is a large shift in temp. It definitely helps dial you in, but it takes a bit of fiddling with all your valves, and so forth to get it dialed in. I do 11 - 10 gal now and since it takes longer to run off, I've had some inadvertent hop stands during cooling. I think that in order to maximize the plate chiller effectiveness, you really need a pump to be sure all the plates are exposed to the wort, and also a high rate of flow on the water. When using gravity only, my wort took an hour to chill from boil with ground water temp. This does not jive with the capabilities of the therminator at all. However, I think it contributesd to an un-intended hop stand.. Nevertheless, I think I am going to use regular additions, plus immersion chiller at end of boil, and then do some ,maybe 3 different additions of 1 oz at 160, 125, and 110 hop additions as the wort chills post-boil and giving maybe 10, 15, and 20 minute rest at each step. I'll bet that would make for some killer flavor and aroma.

Not sure when I'll have a chance to try, but I will def post the results when I do.

TD
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Old 04-17-2013, 06:47 AM   #223
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I tested a hot hop stand at 190-200F, but it didnt seem to work for me. Someone could have said in an earlier post, or I misunderstood, but I can try an cooler hop stand next time.

The hops stands I did was for an Imperial IPA (9% abv) and Pale ale (6.5 abv) I did not notice a difference between these and the previous batches. Typically these hops are a 5 min addition. I moved them to the WP addition instead.

Aprox. 37 oz of hops were used. This is with a 1.5 bbl batch and a 30 min hop stand. I can try at a lower temp next time, but it'll be a month or so before I know the results.

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Old 04-17-2013, 02:16 PM   #224
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but it'll be a month or so before I know the results.
I bet this is the factor that inhibits a lot of our personal understanding of brewing. I know it is for me.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:45 PM   #225
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Well I would ordinarily agree, but look at photography, before digital. You had to wait to develop your film... So you would take notes on exposure settings. Flm back then was not inexpensive, and developing was costly, so you didn't just recklessly snap pictures - well usually anyway.

Taking notes and labeling your beer so you know which batch it is from will help to refine your process over time on how to eliminate flaws.

TD

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Old 04-21-2013, 02:50 PM   #226
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I plate chilled about half the batch and dumped it back into the kettle. The temperature was luckily 117F and then I did a 20 minute aroma steep. Score!

The batch did have some pretty good aroma before I pitched the yeast. Six weeks to judgement day.

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Old 04-21-2013, 03:24 PM   #227
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I brewed 2 different 2.5 gal batches last week and both were FO only hop stands of 30 minutes.

One batch was a 1.060 Red Ale with 3oz Centennial thrown in at 190 degrees, stirred/whirpool every 5 min then cooled down to yeast pitching temps in 15 min. Temp dropped down to 175 after 30 min but I kept the lid on hoping to keep flavors in.

The other was a 1.058 Pale Ale with A 190 FO addition of 2oz Citra for 30 min. I also plan on dry hopping this brew with another oz.

I'm quite curious to see how these turn out, especially if they have enough bitterness, will ley you know in a few weeks.

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Old 04-22-2013, 05:23 PM   #228
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Just thought about this today from a beer I made last night; does a hop stand affect when to add Irish Moss to kettle? I did a one hour hop stand at two temperature steps and noticed that the normal clumping of proteins and clarity of the wort in the kettle was underwhelming compared to when I chill immediately after boiling. What I did was add Irish Moss 10 minutes before the end of the boil, added flameout hops stirred gently every 5 minutes or so until at 30 minutes post boil the temperature was 180 degrees, then chilled to 160 for another 30 minute stand, then chilled down to 70 which took maybe another 1/2 hour (my tap water is on the warm side). Did the hour long hop stand render my Irish Moss ineffective because it was in hot wort too long?

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Old 04-23-2013, 03:28 PM   #229
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Regarding time/temperature, I've done two Stone Ruination clones so far, both utilizing a hop stand. On the first batch, I dropped the temp to 190F, then tossed in the 2oz of Centennial pellets, and stirred occasionally while maintaining temp for 30 mins. The citrus aroma/flavor from this batch was absolutely fantastic.
On the second batch, I did the same as before, but extended the stand to 45 mins instead. The citrus aroma/flavor was no where near as strong as the first batch, to my disappointment.

I'm guessing 190F is above the flashpoint for the citrus flavor hop oil, and the longer hop stand only helped to diminish that flavor. For the next batch, I think I'm going to try a 45 min stand at 170F.

Does anyone know of an article/sight that lists the various hop oils and their flavors, along with flash points?

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Old 04-23-2013, 03:30 PM   #230
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180 F is a simmer and really not all that different from boiling, despite the vigor. For a proper aroma steep, a safe zone is below 170-165 F.

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