Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > How to avoid wild yeasts
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-09-2009, 03:13 PM   #1
BWRIGHT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Anderson, IN
Posts: 354
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default How to avoid wild yeasts

I believe I have been having wild yeasts in my recent brews. They have been pretty lacking in flavor and have a "plastic-like" taste. I brewed up a pale with 35 ibu's and you could hardly notice the hop flavor at all. So, the question is how do I avoid them? I know they can be on the grains themselves and in the dust. Here's my problem. I have to dump my grain, boil, and rack into the primary, all in my kitchen. It's too cold to brew outside. So, how can I keep those little bastards out of my wort?

__________________
BWRIGHT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 04:06 PM   #2
phidelt844
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 174
Default

Are you sure your flavor issues are coming from wild yeasts? I have done PM recipes all in my kitchen and haven't had any problems.

Are you noticing any sort of visible activity from wild yeast? A wild yeast strain should continue to eat at sugars that your brewer's yeast will leave alone, so is your FG continually falling? Try reading your SG from a bottle and see if it is significantly lower than your reading when you initially bottled it. That would indicate some sort of wild yeast eating away at your remaining sugars.

__________________
phidelt844 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 04:25 PM   #3
BWRIGHT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Anderson, IN
Posts: 354
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I don't know about that, but I've all but eliminated almost everything else I can think of. I don't believe the problems I'm having are related to sanitation. Sanitation is good, fermentation temps are good (65), processes are all the same. The descriptions I've found that best describe what I'm tasting is attributed to wild yeast. It tastes kind of like plastic and everything else that you should taste is very muted. The last beer I made the hops were barely noticeable but it had a definite plastic taste.

__________________
BWRIGHT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 04:47 PM   #4
wildwest450
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9,099
Liked 166 Times on 151 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I brew in a dusty ass garage and have never had the tastes you've described.
I'd be willing to bet it's something else, unless your open fermenting.



Have a look at some of these threads.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/gtsearch...sa=Search#1440

__________________

wildwest450 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 05:49 PM   #5
phidelt844
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 174
Default

Are you using chlorine at all in your sanitation? I'm guessing these are AG or PM recipes?

Wild yeast, I believe, will actually form it's own thin krausen type of thing (I'm sure someone else knows the actual name for it). It should be visible in your fermenter/bottles. Since the yeast will consume your other sugars, you'll also end up with a sour or dry flavor.

Plastic taste can be from chlorine solution, either in your tap water or from using bleach for cleaning. I had this problem on one of my brews, since I didn't rinse my bottles out well enough after a chlorine bath. It could also overcome the hop flavor, I suppose. I just think that if you had a wild yeast infection it would be more noticeable.

__________________
phidelt844 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 06:16 PM   #6
FlyGuy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FlyGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3,618
Liked 136 Times on 42 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

I have had a recurring wild yeast infection, and it was nasty to get rid of. My beers were all very thin and had that plasticy, almost a 'burnt electrical' smell/taste to them.

One distinguishing feature will be over-carbonation. Do you bottle? If so, you should be detecting it there right away (left long enough, you will probably get gusher bottles following a wild yeast infection).

As previously mentioned, you might also see some evidence of yeast activity in the bottle, including a small 'krausen' ring at the neck, and 'sediment' stuck to the bottle walls.

It looks a lot like what this guy experienced (although it is hard to say what caused it in his case):

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/my-beer-infected-96355/

In my case, I had multiple spoiled batches in a row until I replaced all the plastic in my brewery. Plastic fermenters and tubing are the really obvious ones. One little microscopic scratch (say from a cleaning rag or sponge) is all it takes to harbour yeast spores that WON'T be killed by typical sanitation.

Anyways, I hope that is helpful (didn't mean to be alarmist!).

FlyGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 06:21 PM   #7
BarleyWater
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BarleyWater's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Armpit of Dallas (Irving), TX
Posts: 2,211
Liked 20 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Same thing happened to me as happened to FlyGuy. The only way to get rid of the infection was a replacement of everything plastic in the brew house. Ultimately, I think it was coming from the bottling bucket, but after 3 spoiled batches in a row, I wasn't taking any chances and replaced all my siphons, canes, hoses, buckets, and got rid off all the old boxes I had my bottles in.

__________________

Fermenting: Nada
On Tap:Cran Wit, Dr Pepper Dubbel, Cascadian Pale Ale, Dark Chocolate Stout, Imperial Stout, Brown Mild, Schwarzbier
On Board: IIPA


www.franconiabrewing.com
BarleyWater is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 09:24 PM   #8
BWRIGHT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Anderson, IN
Posts: 354
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

When you guys say "spoiled" what do you mean? What I 'm getting is a definitive plastic taste. Not like band aids. Like I said, I can't put my finger on it. I've never used Chlorine to clean any of my equipment. Also, I use bottled spring water for ALL my brews. Of all the infection and off flavor threads I"ve researched, none seem to describe what I've got going on. All the flavor of the beer is severely muted and it tastes like plastic. I have no idea. I don't bottle, so that's not much help. I'm going to bottle my next batch to see if I can rule out contamination from the keg and lines.

__________________
BWRIGHT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 11:45 PM   #9
FlyGuy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FlyGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3,618
Liked 136 Times on 42 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Did you keep good notes on the gravity of the beer going into the keg? If so, take a sample again, let all the carbonation de-gas, and take another gravity reading. If you see a substantial drop, I would suspect a yeast infection. They can tear through all sorts of sugars that brewer's yeast can't ferment, and you should see that the batch slowly continues to attenuate.

Keeping the beer cold slows the yeast down, so if the beer is still drinkable, I would be tempted to keep it cold and consume it right away. You might also bottle a couple/few bottles, put them in a warm spot, and then check their gravity after a couple of weeks. If the gravity has dropped in that time, you will know something is amiss. If they gush, you will know that they are infected. They should also taste more and more like plastic as you let them sit.

__________________
Cheap 10 gal cooler MLT$3 AutosiphonAluminum Pot FAQEasy Steam Injection Mash SystemMake a Frozen Yeast Bank
Improving Stovetop Boiling Improving AG Efficiency
FlyGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2009, 02:39 PM   #10
BWRIGHT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Anderson, IN
Posts: 354
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

So once I determine that I am having a wild yeast problem, how do I prevent it?

__________________
BWRIGHT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How can you capture/culture wild yeasts? Reddy Recipes/Ingredients 10 06-23-2013 01:50 AM
I have tried to avoid asking...but OHIOSTEVE Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 75 10-04-2009 04:07 AM
Okay, I usually try to avoid this... Shooter All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 09-21-2009 06:02 PM
what happened? or, how do i avoid this again?? gator Extract Brewing 3 05-07-2007 03:04 PM
Wild Yeasts? beyondthepale General Beer Discussion 1 03-31-2007 12:52 PM



Newest Threads

New

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS