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Old 08-02-2008, 06:01 AM   #1
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Default Hot fermentation temps. How "off" will it taste

Okay, so we are having a hot summer in CO. I haven't brewed yet this summer not because of that but because I didn't have a job. Well I'm employed now, so I ordered ingredients for 3 batches of beer. I brewed the first one Thursday night. It was my Colorado Cream Ale except that I pitched Nottingham instead of Wyeast 1028. I put the carboy in a large bucket of water with an ice pack in my closet in my bedroom (coldest area in my condo) and put a wet towel over it. Pitching temp was around 72. I woke up this morning, changed out the ice packs,and checked the temp and it was still around 72. I knew that was a little warm, but I've brewed beers at that temp before and never had too many off flavors. Well it was a hot all day today, and when I got home from work tonight I went to see how it was doing, and the temp was all the way up to 78 So I switched out the ice pack, got the water on the towel cooler, and that was about all I could do. So the question is, how "off" do you think the flavors will be? A little bit of fruity esters I don't think would hurt this beer too much, but obviously I don't want them overpowering it.

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Old 08-02-2008, 09:45 AM   #2
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You'll never know until you try it I recently did the bathtub trick....and I found that if I closed the door to the bathroom, the a/c vent would really keep it colder in there than the rest of the house. The tub full of water would hold temp well due to the thermal mass, and I could keep it at 65-68 when the a/c was actually at 72-75. Any way to redirect an a/c vent into your closet?

The beer may have more fusels/esters, but will still clean up if you give it time....maybe a few more weeks.

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Old 08-02-2008, 10:44 AM   #3
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I have found that you really need to be getting into the high 70 before getting any noticeable fusels. Of course how evident they will be might depend on the style and a cream ale would probably show them pretty easily. Give it a few extra days in the primary to help clean up and funny flavors and you will be fine.

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Old 08-02-2008, 03:13 PM   #4
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You'll never know until you try it I recently did the bathtub trick....and I found that if I closed the door to the bathroom, the a/c vent would really keep it colder in there than the rest of the house. The tub full of water would hold temp well due to the thermal mass, and I could keep it at 65-68 when the a/c was actually at 72-75. Any way to redirect an a/c vent into your closet?

The beer may have more fusels/esters, but will still clean up if you give it time....maybe a few more weeks.
Unfortunately I don't have AC. Thanks for the comments though guys. Sounds like leaving it in the primary longer will help out some too, so I'll definately do that. Time will tell.
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Old 08-02-2008, 03:19 PM   #5
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I have found that you really need to be getting into the high 70 before getting any noticeable fusels.
I think it depends on the yeast as well as temperature. Nottingham is a pretty clean yeast, so you shouldn't have too many fusels. I did a mild using Fermentis S-04 at 73 F ambient, and it's good, but it tastes very much like New Belgium's Abbey.
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Old 08-02-2008, 03:34 PM   #6
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Since every yeast is different as is every recipe, there is really no way to tell..but even if you have problems, it may not be hopeless...

Read my story;

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=73254

(You never know what your yeasties can do...)

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Old 08-02-2008, 05:32 PM   #7
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Until you get a fridge or freezer and controller you will always be taking a chance. It's just not that expensive to have great beer all the time.

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Old 08-02-2008, 10:38 PM   #8
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I find that you get more longevity through adding frozen 2 liter bottles along with the wet-towel trick. If you still cant get good temp control, i would brew a more forgiving beer like saisons or wheats. Mmm...i love me my dirty wheats.

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Old 08-03-2008, 02:35 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
Since every yeast is different as is every recipe, there is really no way to tell..but even if you have problems, it may not be hopeless...

Read my story;

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=73254

(You never know what your yeasties can do...)

Great write up Revvy. I had no intention of dumping it, and I figured it would be at least drinkable someday, but hopefully with some aging it will come out not just drinkable, but turn instead to be a great beer.
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Old 08-03-2008, 02:37 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FishinDave07 View Post
I find that you get more longevity through adding frozen 2 liter bottles along with the wet-towel trick. If you still cant get good temp control, i would brew a more forgiving beer like saisons or wheats. Mmm...i love me my dirty wheats.
I don't like wheats, so I won't go that route, but saisons I may look into. Either that or just brew like crazy during winter months so that when summer comes I don't have to worry about brewing at all. (I don't really like that option though, cuz I do love brewing.)
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