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Old 06-28-2009, 01:38 PM   #11
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I had a graph that showed the dependency of the isomerization rate on boil temperature, but I can't find it. I'm certain someone at OSU Fermentation Sciences could provide one, but I keep forgetting to ask when I'm down there. I remember being really surprised at what using a pressure cooker could do, even at +15 psi both the rate and maximum IBUs jumped.

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Old 02-17-2010, 12:23 AM   #12
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Just to necro an almost dead thread and update the masses, here are my findings from Winter Park, CO. The main difference is in the bittering hops. The last PA and IPA that I made were barely bitter. The IPA can barely be considered an IPA, except for the fact that it was dry-hopped.

The evaporation rate does not seem to be too terribly different. I always have a few gallons of sterilized water on hand anyway.

I actually find the same amount of sugar is over-carbonating my beer, which makes sense with the PV=nRT equation. Halve the pressure, and the resulting volume is twice the original amount. Luckily I have kegs, so I can slowly bleed the extra pressure. I have had to significantly decrease my priming sugar.

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Old 02-17-2010, 01:22 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Musketear View Post
Just to necro an almost dead thread and update the masses, here are my findings from Winter Park, CO. The main difference is in the bittering hops. The last PA and IPA that I made were barely bitter. The IPA can barely be considered an IPA, except for the fact that it was dry-hopped.

The evaporation rate does not seem to be too terribly different. I always have a few gallons of sterilized water on hand anyway.

I actually find the same amount of sugar is over-carbonating my beer, which makes sense with the PV=nRT equation. Halve the pressure, and the resulting volume is twice the original amount. Luckily I have kegs, so I can slowly bleed the extra pressure. I have had to significantly decrease my priming sugar.
Interesting.

Thanks for the update.

Eric
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Old 02-17-2010, 02:49 PM   #14
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This is all very interesting to me as I am just jumping into homebrewing here in St. Louis, MO, but I am preparing to head out west to Durango, CO which is around 7500 ft. So, I guess I will have to do some experimentation when I get out there.

Another question....If I brew and bottle a beer here in STL, would there be any problems transporting the bottled beer to CO (gain in elevation of roughly 7500ft)?

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Old 05-25-2010, 02:40 PM   #15
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Being a flat-lander (central California - actually 6 ft below sea level!) for all of my brewing days and just tried to brew my first batch at about 5600'. I was surprised by the lack of activity in my yeast starter. What have folks found with that? I am used to a very active started that gives me good foam and vigorous bubbles in the ferm lock. I had a few bubbles and consistent but minor bubbles coming up the side of the beaker. It had good smell so I don't think it was bad. Any thoughts?

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Old 05-25-2010, 03:33 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Musketear View Post
I actually find the same amount of sugar is over-carbonating my beer, which makes sense with the PV=nRT equation. Halve the pressure, and the resulting volume is twice the original amount. Luckily I have kegs, so I can slowly bleed the extra pressure. I have had to significantly decrease my priming sugar.
Check out the link in my sig, contains some findings on how much less we should be carbing at high elevations. Basically, I have found you need to raise the psi by one every time you go up 2000ft.
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Old 05-25-2010, 03:35 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlchemyBrewing View Post
Being a flat-lander (central California - actually 6 ft below sea level!) for all of my brewing days and just tried to brew my first batch at about 5600'. I was surprised by the lack of activity in my yeast starter. What have folks found with that? I am used to a very active started that gives me good foam and vigorous bubbles in the ferm lock. I had a few bubbles and consistent but minor bubbles coming up the side of the beaker. It had good smell so I don't think it was bad. Any thoughts?
I dont have an airlock on my yeast starter, but in my larger starters the fermentation is certainly visible, but only briefly. The smaller ones are not noticeable, or more likely, just too fast. This is consistent with lower elevation brewers.
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Old 05-25-2010, 04:34 PM   #18
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Thanks! I appreciate the help!

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Old 04-16-2011, 05:09 AM   #19
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once again, HBT has come to the plate, and delivered a lot of good information.
now, i have a related question, that may be easy to answer.
i think that it may have to do with altitude, but haven't seen anything here to confirm this, but:
i brew at ~7000ft asl, and apart from the said evaporation, i haven't met a lot of change from norm. there is one big thing that does give me a minute of pause...
gravities... when i brew, i usually add a pound or two of dextrose to raise the ABV, but when i am done with the boil (usually very close to directions in the box, as i usually do partial-mash box kits) my OG is a bit less than what it is 'supposed' to be..
for instance:
a couple days ago i brewed a 'Ruddle County Ale'.. and the OG was supposed to be 1.053... i had 1.046
can someone tell me why?
this is a recurring occurrence, and i suspect altitude.. as there is nothing else changed from the norm, apart from a pound of extra dex in the boil along with the extracts...
it is happily percolating away.. and apologies if i hijacked this thread...

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Old 04-16-2011, 11:52 AM   #20
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As a life-long high-altitude brewer, I gotta call bunk on all of this.

Hop isomerization happens at 140F and up so the difference between a 212F boil and a 195F boil makes a nearly immeasurable difference in IBUs. Certainly less than what a human could taste.

Boil-off rate, while slightly greater at altitude, is far, far more impacted by pot geometry and the amount of energy going into the pot.

Carbonation, whether bottle or keg, is a closed system and has nothing whatsoever to do with altitude. Now once you pour a beer, it will go flat slightly faster due to lower atmospheric pressure, but that just means you need to drink quicker.

Everything else I've seen in this thread - starters, gravities, etc, would have nothing to do with altitude.

One of the local brew clubs out here likes to climb fourteeners in the summer and brew beers at the summit on camping gear. Works fine, every time.

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