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-   -   Has anyone tried caramelizing lactose? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/has-anyone-tried-caramelizing-lactose-346804/)

bottlebomber 08-21-2012 05:37 AM

4 Attachment(s)

So I got my stuff today, and I did it. I feel like it was a big success, and it basically accomplished just what I was after. I decided to sack up and use a dry caramel method. I don't know if that was the best idea, as this stuff behaves MUCH differently than table sugar when it is caramelizing. I had crystallization from hell because I was paranoid about burning it, and stirred about 10x more than I would have if I was making regular caramel. In the end I took it right to where I wanted it, just shy of burnt. One thing that I found very strange was that when sucrose is caramelized, it gets perceivably less sweet as it caramelizes. But with this lactose, it seemed the opposite. It tasted bland and chalky while dry, but rich and sweet when caramelized.
I am very happy with the experiment so far, now I just need to see if the flavor will hold up in the beer. When I was done I put about a pint of water back in, dissolved the caramel, chucked 3 Tahitian vanilla beans in and then put it into secondary and racked my brûlée stout onto it.


bottlebomber 08-21-2012 05:37 AM

4 Attachment(s)

So I got my stuff today, and I did it. I feel like it was a big success, and it basically accomplished just what I was after. I decided to sack up and use a dry caramel method. I don't know if that was the best idea, as this stuff behaves MUCH differently than table sugar when it is caramelizing. I had crystallization from hell because I was paranoid about burning it, and stirred about 10x more than I would have if I was making regular caramel. In the end I took it right to where I wanted it, just shy of burnt. One thing that I found very strange was that when sucrose is caramelized, it gets perceivably less sweet as it caramelizes. But with this lactose, it seemed the opposite. It tasted bland and chalky while dry, but rich and sweet when caramelized.
I am very happy with the experiment so far, now I just need to see if the flavor will hold up in the beer. When I was done I put about a pint of water back in, dissolved the caramel, chucked 3 Tahitian vanilla beans in and then put it into secondary and racked my brûlée stout onto it.


bottlebomber 08-21-2012 05:37 AM

4 Attachment(s)

So I got my stuff today, and I did it. I feel like it was a big success, and it basically accomplished just what I was after. I decided to sack up and use a dry caramel method. I don't know if that was the best idea, as this stuff behaves MUCH differently than table sugar when it is caramelizing. I had crystallization from hell because I was paranoid about burning it, and stirred about 10x more than I would have if I was making regular caramel. In the end I took it right to where I wanted it, just shy of burnt. One thing that I found very strange was that when sucrose is caramelized, it gets perceivably less sweet as it caramelizes. But with this lactose, it seemed the opposite. It tasted bland and chalky while dry, but rich and sweet when caramelized.
I am very happy with the experiment so far, now I just need to see if the flavor will hold up in the beer. When I was done I put about a pint of water back in, dissolved the caramel, chucked 3 Tahitian vanilla beans in and then put it into secondary and racked my brûlée stout onto it.


bottlebomber 08-21-2012 05:37 AM

4 Attachment(s)

So I got my stuff today, and I did it. I feel like it was a big success, and it basically accomplished just what I was after. I decided to sack up and use a dry caramel method. I don't know if that was the best idea, as this stuff behaves MUCH differently than table sugar when it is caramelizing. I had crystallization from hell because I was paranoid about burning it, and stirred about 10x more than I would have if I was making regular caramel. In the end I took it right to where I wanted it, just shy of burnt. One thing that I found very strange was that when sucrose is caramelized, it gets perceivably less sweet as it caramelizes. But with this lactose, it seemed the opposite. It tasted bland and chalky while dry, but rich and sweet when caramelized.
I am very happy with the experiment so far, now I just need to see if the flavor will hold up in the beer. When I was done I put about a pint of water back in, dissolved the caramel, chucked 3 Tahitian vanilla beans in and then put it into secondary and racked my brûlée stout onto it.


bottlebomber 09-14-2012 05:39 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by emjay
Huh? I didn't say that. In fact, I said the opposite. :/
My apologies for the misunderstanding. See, I've been spending too much time with you in the debate forum. If I had been spending more time in the Tap Room, I could just call you a bitch and be done with it
Quote:
The thing I have been disagreeing with was your initial assertion (and then later reassertion) that caramelizing sucrose for beer was an exercise in futility as it would just be completely fermented anyways, which simply isn't true.
Aaah, gotcha. It's been a long week. Well, the good news is that said fermentation is underway. I deeply caramelized 50 grams of sugar until it was smoking. Even with my primitive equipment, both samples came out to exactly 1.028 on my refractometer, and 1.030 on the hydro. I wish I would have made it higher gravity to get a broader spectrum, and it might not be adequate. If no obvious difference is measurable, I may try it again with 150 grams.

The difference to me though, is that for my application I would not use simple sugar, because it is a stout. I wanted the caramel to be fully non-fermentable, not just partially.

bottlebomber 09-14-2012 05:39 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by emjay
Huh? I didn't say that. In fact, I said the opposite. :/
My apologies for the misunderstanding. See, I've been spending too much time with you in the debate forum. If I had been spending more time in the Tap Room, I could just call you a bitch and be done with it
Quote:
The thing I have been disagreeing with was your initial assertion (and then later reassertion) that caramelizing sucrose for beer was an exercise in futility as it would just be completely fermented anyways, which simply isn't true.
Aaah, gotcha. It's been a long week. Well, the good news is that said fermentation is underway. I deeply caramelized 50 grams of sugar until it was smoking. Even with my primitive equipment, both samples came out to exactly 1.028 on my refractometer, and 1.030 on the hydro. I wish I would have made it higher gravity to get a broader spectrum, and it might not be adequate. If no obvious difference is measurable, I may try it again with 150 grams.

The difference to me though, is that for my application I would not use simple sugar, because it is a stout. I wanted the caramel to be fully non-fermentable, not just partially.

bottlebomber 09-14-2012 05:39 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by emjay
Huh? I didn't say that. In fact, I said the opposite. :/
My apologies for the misunderstanding. See, I've been spending too much time with you in the debate forum. If I had been spending more time in the Tap Room, I could just call you a bitch and be done with it
Quote:
The thing I have been disagreeing with was your initial assertion (and then later reassertion) that caramelizing sucrose for beer was an exercise in futility as it would just be completely fermented anyways, which simply isn't true.
Aaah, gotcha. It's been a long week. Well, the good news is that said fermentation is underway. I deeply caramelized 50 grams of sugar until it was smoking. Even with my primitive equipment, both samples came out to exactly 1.028 on my refractometer, and 1.030 on the hydro. I wish I would have made it higher gravity to get a broader spectrum, and it might not be adequate. If no obvious difference is measurable, I may try it again with 150 grams.

The difference to me though, is that for my application I would not use simple sugar, because it is a stout. I wanted the caramel to be fully non-fermentable, not just partially.


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