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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Gelatin vs. Cold Conditioning
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Old 03-18-2013, 03:50 PM   #11
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i agree, 1/4 pack of additional dry yeast is cheap insurance and keeps you from waiting months (potentially)

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Old 03-18-2013, 09:06 PM   #12
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While I like the clarity of gelatin, what I don't like is the odd bits it causes in the bottles when I use it. It makes the beers crystal clear, but also makes this fluffy particulate matter at the bottom of the fermenter and bottle that is difficult to avoid even if careful racking from point a to point b.

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Old 03-18-2013, 09:13 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by highgravitybacon View Post
While I like the clarity of gelatin, what I don't like is the odd bits it causes in the bottles when I use it. It makes the beers crystal clear, but also makes this fluffy particulate matter at the bottom of the fermenter and bottle that is difficult to avoid even if careful racking from point a to point b.
Rack with a fine mesh nylon bag secured around your auto-siphon.
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:24 PM   #14
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I've never noticed gelatin solid in bottles. I've stored at near freezing for 5 days after adding the gelatin and rack carefully. Sometimes gelatin appears to make a thin film that coats the inside of the carboy so it's not clear anymore.

Reyeasting adds a fine layer of sediment to the bottle, nothing different than any other bottle conditioned beer that becomes more solid with time. The following pic is yeast added at 1 million cells/mL, a few days after bottling, when testing different procedures to minimize this yeast layer but still carbonate within the standard 3 week time.

bottling-yeast-cake_20e9-cells-per-gram.jpg

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Old 03-19-2013, 01:48 AM   #15
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Pretty new here and was planning to gelatin my next brew in about a week. I've seen both opinions, but is it really necessary to add new yeast after gelatin if you plan to bottle?
I use gelatin on about half my beers. I only add additional yeast when it's been over 6 months since brewing (basically sours, ciders, and the occasional high gravity beer). I've never had one fail to carbonate out of a couple of hundred batches; but sometimes it takes more than a few weeks.
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Old 03-19-2013, 04:04 AM   #16
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This is a great discussion so I don't want to take it into a different direction, but I do want to ask those who bottle condition their beer.

I have read that the normal amount of corn sugar to use for carbonation is either 2/3, 3/4, and some even use 1 cup per 5 gallons. What do you normally use?

I ask because I have an Irish Blonde Ale and I feel it's not carbonated enough: I used 2/3 cup corn sugar for 5 gallons. I previously made an Irish Red Ale using 3/4 cup of corn sugar and the carbonation/head is wonderful, but these things are really lacking in the blonde ale. You were all talking about adding yeast to your beers when adding gelatin, what about adding a little bit more sugar to the beer bottles and recap? Will this help?

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Old 03-19-2013, 06:05 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by lmarkis View Post
This is a great discussion so I don't want to take it into a different direction, but I do want to ask those who bottle condition their beer.

I have read that the normal amount of corn sugar to use for carbonation is either 2/3, 3/4, and some even use 1 cup per 5 gallons. What do you normally use?

I ask because I have an Irish Blonde Ale and I feel it's not carbonated enough: I used 2/3 cup corn sugar for 5 gallons. I previously made an Irish Red Ale using 3/4 cup of corn sugar and the carbonation/head is wonderful, but these things are really lacking in the blonde ale. You were all talking about adding yeast to your beers when adding gelatin, what about adding a little bit more sugar to the beer bottles and recap? Will this help?
There are lots of threads about calculators for priming sugar. Here is one online calculator (http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/brew/widgets/bp.html). When it asks for temperature, use the warmest temperature the beer was stored at, not the current temperature of the beer when bottling (cold conditioning, lagering, cold crashing).

Most would suggest measuring priming sugar by weight. One rule-of-thumb is a 1 oz of priming sugar per 1 gallon of finished beer (results in 2.7 vol CO2). The online calculator is good when you want to prime for more/less carbonation. Grams are nice to use for such fine measurments.

Adding more sugar to already primed beer is more dangerous than adding more yeast and recapping. If you're sure of the amount of sugar you added, then maybe the yeast haven't finished fermenting it. You could tip the bottles over and store warmer to see if they change. The problem is that volume measurements can be inaccurate for sugar. I'd just enjoy the Blonde the way it is and brew another batch and refine your techniques.

Brewing ingredients like carapils, wheat, flaked grains can help head/head retension more then just increasing carbonation.
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Old 03-22-2013, 01:44 AM   #18
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You were all talking about adding yeast to your beers when adding gelatin, what about adding a little bit more sugar to the beer bottles and recap? Will this help?
Use a priming calculator for sugar additions.

You can't really add more sugar to an already carb'd beer. Once the new sugar is added, it creates nucleation sites for the CO2 and it gushes out before you get a chance to put the cap back on. Try it on a bottle; the worst that can happen is that you get to drink it.
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Old 03-23-2013, 06:16 AM   #19
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Typically I use 3/4 cup of sugar to carbonate and I get a good carbonation in 2 weeks.

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