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-   -   full boils on kitchen gas stove (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/full-boils-kitchen-gas-stove-368483/)

scottab 11-18-2012 12:43 AM

full boils on kitchen gas stove
 
Currently i am an extract brewer with a 3 gallon kettle which has worked fine so far.
I'm planning on getting a larger kettle so i can do full boils but wince i'm not planning on getting a propane burner any time soon i don't know if i should waste my money buying the larger kettle or the 2.5 gallon keg adventures in homebrewing has on sale.

Are fill boils possible on a home gas stove?
The kettle i'm planning on getting is the 8 gallon kettle megapot like:
http://www.amazon.com/Beer-Brewing-Kettle-Valve-Thermometer/dp/B003EW8HWY/ref=sr_1_2?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1353202722&sr=1-2

I have an average 4 burner GE range stove/oven.

Would i be better off getting the keg setup?

scottab 11-18-2012 12:45 AM

Btw, i know this has been covered to some large degree here and elsewhere.

Yooper 11-18-2012 12:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottab (Post 4599649)
Currently i am an extract brewer with a 3 gallon kettle which has worked fine so far.
I'm planning on getting a larger kettle so i can do full boils but wince i'm not planning on getting a propane burner any time soon i don't know if i should waste my money buying the larger kettle or the 2.5 gallon keg adventures in homebrewing has on sale.

Are fill boils possible on a home gas stove?
The kettle i'm planning on getting is the 8 gallon kettle megapot like:
http://www.amazon.com/Beer-Brewing-Kettle-Valve-Thermometer/dp/B003EW8HWY/ref=sr_1_2?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1353202722&sr=1-2

I have an average 4 burner GE range stove/oven.

Would i be better off getting the keg setup?

I have a kick-ass burner on my gas stove (it's a professional stove) and I could use a 7.5 gallon kettle on that one burner and get a nice boil. It barely fit under my microwave, but it did, so it worked great for me.

It really depends on YOUR stove, though, of course. Even with my great professional burner, it took about an hour to bring 6.5 gallons to a boil.

BrewThruYou 11-18-2012 02:35 AM

I have a fairly standard GE NG stove and one burner is 12k BTU, two are 8k i think and one is a 4k simmer burner. I put a 10G Blichmann on the biggest burner and didn't have any problems getting to a boil and getting a decent rolling boil. I usually did 7G preboil. It BARELY fit under my microwave.

GilSwillBasementBrews 11-18-2012 02:39 AM

Yeah second the depends on your stove.

I have an electric stove and can do full 5 gallon batches in my 30qt turkey fryer pot on it.
Boiling 6.5 gallons and keep it with a steady rolling boil. So it really does depend on your stove as I know a lot of other brewers in here have made comment about having a hard time boiling on an electric stove.

Beer-lord 11-18-2012 02:41 AM

I've got a 9 gallon kettle and I straddle it over 2 burners and more than 75% of each burner is utilized. It works fine as I boil about 7.5 gallons of water in it.
I also put tin foil on below the grates for spills but it also reflects the heat and helps....I think.

pcollins 11-18-2012 02:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yooper (Post 4599655)
I have a kick-ass burner on my gas stove (it's a professional stove) and I could use a 7.5 gallon kettle on that one burner and get a nice boil. It barely fit under my microwave, but it did, so it worked great for me.

It really depends on YOUR stove, though, of course. Even with my great professional burner, it took about an hour to bring 6.5 gallons to a boil.

I'm THRILLED to hear this from a respected home brewer!

I have a GE Profile gas stove and that was about my rate to get a pot of covered cold tap water to a boil. I turn my stove on high as soon as I start lautering and I'm still at about an hour before I hit the official boil mark. I take about 45 minutes to lauter so it's not too bad of a lag time.

I think you should be fine.

To answer the question, I think you should go for the larger kettle as you're headed in that direction anyway. I think eventually you'd be kicking yourself for getting the smaller kegs. My opinion.

scottab 11-18-2012 03:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pcollins

To answer the question, I think you should go for the larger kettle as you're headed in that direction anyway. I think eventually you'd be kicking yourself for getting the smaller kegs. My opinion.

The smaller keg is because the fridge i would put it in is our secondary and not a lot of space in it, particularly height space... eventually i'll prob build a keezer or a dorm fridge kegerator but i'd like to save myself some time since i pre boil my top off water the day before or up to 3 days before. Getting 3gal boiling takes out 20-30 min on my stove so the hour long time to bring the full boil to temp is not a major loss of time... in fact when i consider it with the pre boil i gain time.

daggers_nz 11-18-2012 08:39 AM

I used to boil on an electric stove. took forever and stunk out the house, so I moved outdoors. Still got a 92-93 degree boil going and made some good beers.

wilserbrewer 11-18-2012 10:27 AM

If I were thinking of trying to do large stovetop boils, I would think that an aluminum kettle would be best at heat transfer, followed by a stainless kettle, then a layered thick bottom kettle like the megapot. A thick bottom kettle is not needed for boiling wort and likely takes more energy IMHO. YMMV cheers

45 bucks delivered...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/40-Quarts-Aluminum-Stock-Pot-Set-With-Lid-and-Bottom-Steamer-Cookware-Pan-/310436139907?pt=Cookware&hash=item48476f9383


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