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Old 10-18-2012, 10:11 PM   #1
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Default Force carbonation time

Hi everyone.

I have been having trouble force carbonating my beer.

I have now ruined too many batches by over carbonating them.

I have been using this http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php

The thing is that it does not say how long it takes.

I have had it hooked up for two weeks and at first it is all right. But then later the beer starts so get that sparkling water sourness to it. And some have become undrinkable. In those I can even smell the CO2

So for how long do you leave the kegs hooked up to the gas?



.

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Old 10-18-2012, 10:14 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firebird400 View Post
Hi everyone.

I have been having trouble force carbonating my beer.

I have now ruined too many batches by over carbonating them.

I have been using this http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php

The thing is that it does not say how long it takes.

I have had it hooked up for two weeks and at first it is all right. But then later the beer starts so get that sparkling water sourness to it. And some have become undrinkable. In those I can even smell the CO2

So for how long do you leave the kegs hooked up to the gas?



.
It takes about 10-14 days to fully carb up. What do you have yours set to, to get so much co2 into the beer? It sounds like "carbonic acid bite", from being overcarbed.
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Old 10-18-2012, 10:23 PM   #3
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And if you set to the correct pressure and temperature for the carbonation level you wish to achieve, you leave the keg hooked up to the gas until it is gone.

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Old 10-18-2012, 10:23 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firebird400 View Post
Hi everyone.

I have been having trouble force carbonating my beer.

I have now ruined too many batches by over carbonating them.

I have been using this http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php

The thing is that it does not say how long it takes.

I have had it hooked up for two weeks and at first it is all right. But then later the beer starts so get that sparkling water sourness to it. And some have become undrinkable. In those I can even smell the CO2

So for how long do you leave the kegs hooked up to the gas?



.
You are supposed to leave them on constantly. The chart shows the vols of CO2 at equilibrium. That's why they don't show a time. My best guess is that you are reading the chart or your regulator wrong.
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Old 10-18-2012, 10:29 PM   #5
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You are supposed to leave them on constantly. The chart shows the vols of CO2 at equilibrium. That's why they don't show a time. My best guess is that you are reading the chart or your regulator wrong.
Or the beer temperature is getting lower while the CO2 is at the same pressure, resulting in over-carbonation.

IME, it takes (as mentioned by Yooper) 10-14 days (or more) to carbonate at serving pressure. I typically plan on 2-3 weeks from when the fully chilled beer is put on gas before I pull a pint.

BTW, IF it does come out over carbonated this way, you CAN correct it. Simply disconnect the gas fitting from the keg, or turn off that line on the manifold, and vent it 2-4 times a day for 2-3 days. That's a starting point, your brew might require more time to equalize.

BTW, I would recommend getting a solid way to get the temperature of the beer in the keg. Right now, I have a sensor connected to a keg, with insulation covering it, with the display outside the fridge. This gives me a solid idea of the actual brew temperature in the keg. I've also been using thermometer strips on the kegs, that read in the range good for this application. Personally, I like being able to see the temperature without having to open up the brew fridge (and effecting the reading).
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Old 10-19-2012, 02:02 AM   #6
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I put my kegs on 30psi for 36-48hrs tasting after 36 and busting it down to serving pressure (usually 8-9psi) when it gets close. They usually settle in by the third or fourth day. Cheers!

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Old 10-20-2012, 02:06 PM   #7
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I have a good temp controlled chest freezer so Im good on the temp side.

I how ever am doubtful of my pressure regulator and will invest in a new one before carbing the batches I have fermenting now (aromatic xmas ale and double choc robust porter)

I am sure I am reading the chart right.

Thank you for clearing this up for me.

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Old 10-21-2012, 03:28 AM   #8
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Splurge on a good regulator the first time and you won't have to re-buy or worry about it. Taprite regulators go for about $100, but they're solid and worth it IMO

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Old 10-21-2012, 02:36 PM   #9
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Here is some good info about carbing. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/keg-...strated-73328/

I much prefer the set it and forget it method. It is too easy to overcarb trying to speed things up.

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Old 10-21-2012, 03:25 PM   #10
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1)Chill the kegged beer to the correct temperature.
2)Find the correct pressure based on the chart, set regulator accordingly.
3)Agitate the keg for ~10 minutes (I prefer the rolling under foot method) with CO2 hooked up. You will know when you are done because the regulator will stop humming and you will hear no more bubbles going into the keg.
4)Call it a day, enjoy a homebrew and pat yourself on the back for saving yourself 13 days.

Overcarbonation is impossible with this method, because your temperatures and pressures are set correctly. The reason it works so fast is that you are dynamically bringing new beer to the surface to be permeated by the gas. Cheers!

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