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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Filtering & Turnaround time
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Old 04-16-2010, 03:51 PM   #1
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Default Filtering & Turnaround time

Hey all - I'm about to try my hand at filtering my beer.

Long story short, my dad has gotten some major blowouts because of the yeast in my homebrew wreaking havoc on his intestines. So I'm going to try to strip out as much as possible and hope he doesn't **** a bus everytime he drinks my beer.

After a 10 day ferment and 4 day chilling, I'm planning on filtering (essentially 2 weeks after brew day). How soon after filtering will most beers hit prime? Right away or does it still need some aging?

Any recommendations on the process? Thanks all!

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Old 04-16-2010, 04:03 PM   #2
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14 days is way too early! Fermentation may be done, but your beer is not. If you filter out your yeast at this point you will be disappointed. All my beers get 1 month in primary, then cold crash for one day, then add gelatin and continue to cold crash for 3-4 more days before racking to keg. This clears the beer up real nice. The extended time in primary alone will make a dramatic difference in the clarity and taste of your beer. 10day IMO for the majority of beers, is too fast.

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Old 04-16-2010, 04:24 PM   #3
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Ditto on the longer fermentation.

If you let it sit 3-4 weeks most of the yeast will drop out on it's own. Just be careful not to disturb the turb when you rack it out of the fermenter. you may not need to filter at all.

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Old 04-16-2010, 04:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Special Hops View Post
Ditto on the longer fermentation.

If you let it sit 3-4 weeks most of the yeast will drop out on it's own. Just be careful not to disturb the turb when you rack it out of the fermenter. you may not need to filter at all.

nah, that's my process now and there's still a ton in there. Beer looks very clear - maybe not brilliant - but very clear. I want to speed up my process and get them in kegs for transport ASAP.

Filtering is gonna happen, I have all the gear already.
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Old 04-16-2010, 04:55 PM   #5
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The only way to know for sure is to give it a try on EACH beer you brew since each beer is different. The simpler beers will ferment out faster and thus will show better results filtering at 10-14 days.

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Old 04-16-2010, 05:23 PM   #6
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Quote:
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14 days is way too early!
Not in my experience. I rack and filter 80% of my beers (ales < 1.065) in 14 days. The only beers I delay racking and filtering are high gravity (> 1.065) ales and lagers (rack but do not filter).

Once the yeast have completed their post fermentation "cleanup" work and flocculated out of solution, there is no reason to keep them in contact with the [now mature] beer.
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Old 04-16-2010, 05:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RevIP View Post
14 days is way too early! Fermentation may be done, but your beer is not. If you filter out your yeast at this point you will be disappointed. All my beers get 1 month in primary, then cold crash for one day, then add gelatin and continue to cold crash for 3-4 more days before racking to keg. This clears the beer up real nice. The extended time in primary alone will make a dramatic difference in the clarity and taste of your beer. 10day IMO for the majority of beers, is too fast.

can you define what you consider cold crash??(Temps and durations) also you do no secondary clarifying? just extend the first stage fermenting?

I like the process less work with improved results
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Old 04-16-2010, 05:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevorino View Post
nah, that's my process now and there's still a ton in there. Beer looks very clear - maybe not brilliant - but very clear. I want to speed up my process and get them in kegs for transport ASAP.

Filtering is gonna happen, I have all the gear already.
my bad. I read your OP as you currently do 14 days without filtering.
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Old 04-16-2010, 11:32 PM   #9
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It won't reduce the time for the beer to condition, if that's what you are asking.

Do you have a sub-micron filter, like a 0.5 or 0.3 micron? Anything larger than that will leave a fair amount of yeast in the beer. The best approach is to run the beer through a 2-5 micron filter, then a fine one.

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Old 04-17-2010, 12:08 AM   #10
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according to Fix, a 3 micron absolute filter will get you an order of magnitude reduction in yeast and it is preferentially removing larger cells so the impact on yeast mass is even larger. Fix's lab results suggested that this was the finest level that did not have a significant impact on beer flavor and color and this was what he recommended for home brewers or craft brewers with regional distribution.

Anecdotally, people using 5 and 7 micron filters report dramatically less mass in the keg.

But yeah, if you are trying to get sterile beer, sub-micron is necessary and that will take some color and flavor and bitterness with it too (you can make up for this in the recipe though).

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