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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Filter batch before kegging
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Old 02-05-2014, 07:20 PM   #21
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Shotataduck, you are making a solution for a problem that don't exist.
The bits in your IPA are of your making!
Address the part of your process that is failing, then you won't need to think about filtering , you will be able to pour a beer , hold it to a light , then say that looks terrific, I made it, now I am gonna drink it. What an achievement.

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Old 02-06-2014, 12:20 AM   #22
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Okay so I am leaning towards cold crashing. Currently my Irish Red has been in the secondary carboy for three days. New plan is to leave it until day seven then put into 35 degree give or take for seven days, then keg.....thoughts? Remember my goal is not clarity but yeast removal. I know it does not hurt you, I just want to minimize the amount in my beer.


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Old 02-06-2014, 12:41 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Ittldo View Post
I know it does not hurt you, I just want to minimize the amount in my beer.
Why is it important to you to remove the yeast from beer?
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Old 02-06-2014, 02:20 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ittldo View Post
Okay so I am leaning towards cold crashing. Currently my Irish Red has been in the secondary carboy for three days. New plan is to leave it until day seven then put into 35 degree give or take for seven days, then keg.....thoughts? Remember my goal is not clarity but yeast removal. I know it does not hurt you, I just want to minimize the amount in my beer.


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Sounds like a plan. The first time you do this, you'll be amazed at the way it drops the yeast out and firms up the cake. It also helps to take care while siphoning to avoid putting the bottom of the siphon into the yeast cake. You'll have enough yeast left to bottle carb if you want, but the amount in the bottom of each bottle will be less.

Prime and bottle the beer cold. I like to use a sanitized spoon to very, very gently stir the primed beer to evenly distribute the sugar. If using a priming calc, enter the highest temp that the beer saw during the ferment process, not the cold crash temp.
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Old 02-06-2014, 02:34 AM   #25
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Why is it important to you to remove the yeast from beer?

The importance arises based on the ability of some to tolerate yeast. So then the challenge to remove as much as possible and still maintain a optimum level of flavor and body. Challenge accepted.


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Old 02-09-2014, 10:02 AM   #26
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Filtering also has the advantage that it can remove very small impurities from the beer - even those that would not fall out of suspension even during cold crashing or the natural aging process. Filters can remove particles as small as 1 micron or even smaller. This can result in a cleaner flavor and much better clarity than is possible with natural aging. Around 1 micron is the sweet spot for filter size - smaller than 0.5 microns and you risk filtering out some flavor, while larger ones (5 micron and up) may leave yeast in the beer. To filter out bacteria which some commercial brewers do for shelf stability, you need to go to 0.3 microns or below. But I don't recommend going below 0.5 microns Another factor when choosing filter size is how fast your filter may clog. Many commercial brewers actually use a two stage filter. They start with a 5 micron filter to eliminate the large particles and then use a smaller 0.5 micron filter inline as a second stage to filter small particles. If you have a large budget you can do the same, but for a single filter 1 micron is fine. Despite the fact that filtering can be used to accelerate the aging of your beer, you don't want to filter your home brewed beer too early. Some important chemical changes take place during the later phases of fermentation and early aging. If you halt these too early by filtering you will end up with poor flavor balance. Commercial brewers use a additives and techniques that allow them to filter earlier.
Allow the beer to fully complete fermentation and then sit in the secondary for at least 2-3 weeks before filtering, then move it to your keg. The filtering process is very simple if you use two kegs. Place your inline filter in between the full and empty kegs and use low CO2 pressure to transfer the beer from one keg to the other through the filter.

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Old 02-09-2014, 10:12 AM   #27
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After all of that I'm still not a big fan of filtering out yeast, because of bottle condition procedures

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Old 03-08-2014, 01:43 PM   #28
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Thanks to all for the constructive input. Cold crashed and kegged, worked great I will probably only cold crash and not filter.


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