Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Exploring "no chill" brewing

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-30-2010, 11:16 AM   #771
wyzazz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Atwater, OH
Posts: 4,263
Liked 39 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 48

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pol View Post
Yes, and that is the point...
Then again, I guess all that stuff would just settle out normally and you'd be left with less beer anyway. You wouldn't lose as much the "traditional" way but I guess that just means you have to brew more!
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
And I'd like to see my 1.080 beers ready from grain to glass in a week, and served to me by red-headed twin penthouse pets wearing garter belts and fishnet stockings, with Irish accents, calling me "master luv gun," but we can't always get what we want can we? :)
wyzazz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2010, 02:16 AM   #772
The Pol
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 11,616
Liked 53 Times on 50 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wyzazz View Post
Then again, I guess all that stuff would just settle out normally and you'd be left with less beer anyway. You wouldn't lose as much the "traditional" way but I guess that just means you have to brew more!
The byproducts, some of them, that the Burton method removes from the beer, dont settle out. Some of that stuff remains apparently and changes the properties of the brew. I dunno, worth checking out!
__________________
The Pol is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2010, 12:46 PM   #773
Jonnio
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Jonnio's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,525
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pol View Post
The byproducts, some of them, that the Burton method removes from the beer, dont settle out. Some of that stuff remains apparently and changes the properties of the brew. I dunno, worth checking out!
Pol - I am starting to lean towards your way of thinking on this one, but more for the sake of efficiency.

I found out with my first no chill a corny will actually hold about 5 1/4 or so gallons if you fill it right up to the top. My thought is to brew and do the no-chilling in a corny keg (like I have been). Take the gas post off and ferment in the same keg, then do a keg to keg transfer when it's all done, throwing the first cup or so out.

Should net you about 4 3/4 or so gallons in the finished keg is my best guess.
__________________

------------------------------------------------
Official member of HBAMAP (Home Brewers Against Murder and Pedophilia)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
Then that means dumping your beer because you think it's bad is tantamount to abortion! And as Big Kahuna says, drinking a beer too soon is tatamount to beer pedophilia...
Jonnio is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 01:49 PM   #774
nutty_gnome
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
nutty_gnome's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NJ
Posts: 1,070
Liked 45 Times on 37 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

I was looking through my worn copy of the Joy of Homebrewing and in the all grain section, before starting with the littany of recipies, Papazzian actually does suggest that you can add hot wort to a 'sufficiently heated' carboy and then let that cool to room temp. He also notes that brewers may leave the wort to cool for many hours before pitching if other forms of cooling aren't available.

I dont think its a good idea to mix glass, heat and boiling wort. But, apparently people have been kicking these alternatives around for a long time.

__________________

N_G
It could be worse.

nutty_gnome is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 04:38 PM   #775
TwoHeadsBrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chico, CA
Posts: 3,930
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I recently purchased some Sanke Keg Fermenter kits, and a couple used Sanke kegs from the scrapyard. For my next brew, I was thinking how wonderful it would be to not worry one bit about cooling the wort. I could just transfer the boiling wort into the sanke keg, and clamp on the dip tube assembly. The only worry I have is that as the wort cools, air could be sucked into the keg thorugh the airlock port. Not sure what I'd use to cap this off, but it seems like whenever I un-capped it, the air would rush in and possibly inject airborne wild yeast/bacteria into the wort. Any ideas?

For reference, this is the setup I'll be using:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/sanke-fermenter-conversion-128262/

__________________

Fermenting: ESB
Kegged: Extra IPA, Brown Ale, American Wheat, Blackheart Stout
Coming Up: Dunkleweizen, 3C Pale Ale


DIY Fermentation Chamber
More Brew Stuff
TwoHeadsBrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 06:02 PM   #776
tbeard
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Montana, Montana
Posts: 24
Default

Just to clear up any confusion, My hot wort method does not sanitize the carboy, that must be done before any wort is added, my method is just another precaution against airborne yeasts and bacteria, as the hot wort in the carboy is generally too hot for wild yeasts and bacterias to thrive.

__________________
tbeard is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 07:27 PM   #777
smiths9312
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: raleigh
Posts: 74
Default

[QUOTE=TwoHeadsBrewing;1852609]I recently purchased some Sanke Keg Fermenter kits, and a couple used Sanke kegs from the scrapyard. For my next brew, I was thinking how wonderful it would be to not worry one bit about cooling the wort. I could just transfer the boiling wort into the sanke keg, and clamp on the dip tube assembly. The only worry I have is that as the wort cools, air could be sucked into the keg thorugh the airlock port. Not sure what I'd use to cap this off, but it seems like whenever I un-capped it, the air would rush in and possibly inject airborne wild yeast/bacteria into the wort. Any ideas?

For reference, this is the setup I'll be using:
QUOTE]

Wrap aluminum foil around the ports or use a cotton ball held on by foil.

__________________
smiths9312 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 07:39 PM   #778
jeffmeh
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jeffmeh's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,816
Liked 131 Times on 112 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
I recently purchased some Sanke Keg Fermenter kits, and a couple used Sanke kegs from the scrapyard. For my next brew, I was thinking how wonderful it would be to not worry one bit about cooling the wort. I could just transfer the boiling wort into the sanke keg, and clamp on the dip tube assembly. The only worry I have is that as the wort cools, air could be sucked into the keg thorugh the airlock port. Not sure what I'd use to cap this off, but it seems like whenever I un-capped it, the air would rush in and possibly inject airborne wild yeast/bacteria into the wort. Any ideas?

For reference, this is the setup I'll be using:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/sanke-fermenter-conversion-128262/

How about some paper towel or cotton gauze, soaked in Star San and sprayed occasionally to keep moist?
__________________
jeffmeh is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 07:40 PM   #779
giligson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Vancouver Area - Canada
Posts: 755
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
...The only worry I have is that as the wort cools, air could be sucked into the keg thorugh the airlock port. Not sure what I'd use to cap this off, but it seems like whenever I un-capped it, the air would rush in and possibly inject airborne wild yeast/bacteria into the wort. Any ideas?...

Two thoughts come to mind:
1) could you rig up a connection to your CO2 tank (if you force carb)
2) use an inline sterile filter with one of these disposable filters on your vent in line:
http://www.google.com/products?q=sterile+filter+syringe&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-USfficial&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=tjtnS5eYI4WwswOOgtWdAw&sa=X&oi=product_result _group&ct=title&resnum=3&ved=0CC8QrQQwAg

Used in medicine/surgery - you don't need the ones use to sterilize fluids but the cheaper ones that are used for drawing up sterile air.
__________________

We who are about to Brew, salute you!

giligson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 07:47 PM   #780
MultumInParvo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Detroit, Michigan
Posts: 791
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ipscman View Post
I think, offhand, that the only problem would be oxidizing the wort while in the pot. When you put it in a Winpak, e.g., it contracts as it cools and forces all of the oxygen out. Whether it makes a big difference for home brewers is the question.

Do you whirlpool when it is cold or? How do you handle the removal of hot break?
I haven't had any noticeable oxidation. Air clearly enters since the wort is cooling (and therefore contracting) so air from outside flows in through the top of the lid. However, I doubt that this small amount can really change much. At least for me I cannot tell.

I do a little whirlpool when it is hot, then just use an Auto Siphon about 18 hours later. Nearly all of the hot break is settled out and I just siphon off the top. Hop debris and whatnot left in the pot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pol View Post
I think I am actually going to start fermenting in Cornies...[/I][/B]
I think you should do it. That way I can say that The Pol started using one of his methods AFTER I did.

But seriously. I love fermenting in a corny. There is a handle so they're easy to move around. They're completely shielded from light. You can transfer under pressure (and even pressure ferment). They take up a smaller floor space and therefore more fit in my brewing closet. You can clean them with practically anything. If you want to you can keep your beer in the same vessel from brew day until consumption. They're nearly impossible to 'break'. And the list goes on...

I am personally using a defoaming agent much like Ferm Cap S and I am doing 4.5 gallon batches. No problems at all here. Although mimicking a Burton style fermenter with a blow off would be interesting. I have my next 2 brews already planned, but when I do another Mild I'll use a blow off and compare it to my past Milds...
__________________
MultumInParvo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"American" or "Imperial" Oatmeal Stout Recipe: Critiques please! cladinshadows Recipes/Ingredients 4 01-04-2012 10:21 PM
Small Scale Commerical Brewing (600gal/mo) on "Beer Budget" GuateBrewer All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 11-02-2010 12:46 PM
"Video Surveillance on the Fly" or "Urine trouble now mister!" Tenchiro Debate Forum 1 05-23-2009 06:33 PM
NPR Fans: "The Science of Brewing" on Talk of the Nation tomorrow 2-3pm EDT tmoney1224 General Beer Discussion 37 05-21-2008 12:06 AM
Miller "Chill" casper0074 General Beer Discussion 5 09-30-2007 05:16 PM