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Old 05-09-2012, 07:34 PM   #1281
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When I went to pitch yeast, the tank didn't look all sucked in like it normally does. It didn't look bulged out or anything, but it definitely wasn't slightly collapsed like it normally is. The wort smells fairly sour too
...

So let this be a warning at best, and a lesson at worst (if the beer is ruined). Its OK to let your wort cool to 200F or so before pouring in, but don't risk it getting much cooler.
Are you sure you had a good seal on your cube? And the sooner you transfer after flame-out the less likely you'll pick up an infection.

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I've been putting mine in the winpak right after flameout. It seriously sucks in and permenantly destorts the winpak but I feel better about not getting infected.
I do the same thing: open the ball valve at flame-out, squeeze out the air (if I don't plan on fermenting in the WinPak), and seal tightly. If I want to get the dents out of the WinPak I just fill it with hot water and let it sit for a few minutes, then squeeze it back into shape.


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Old 05-09-2012, 08:14 PM   #1282
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Are you sure you had a good seal on your cube? And the sooner you transfer after flame-out the less likely you'll pick up an infection.
Yeah good point, it could have been that the cap wasn't screwed tight enough. I've gone back to transfering within a few minutes of flameout now, and I'll experiment with other ways of keeping hop aroma.

I just pitched yeast on a new batch yesterday that was definitely more "normal" in the tank (sides still sucked it, smelled great, etc).


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Old 05-10-2012, 02:40 PM   #1283
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I don't want to find the post with his table in it but I have to say I kind of agree with you ghpeel. I'm finding that I am not getting nearly as many IBUs from cube hopping as I expected when I first started this. I get more flavor but not too much aroma either. I haven't cube hopped for a while because I don't fully understand how it will affect the beer yet.

However, for the last 4 batches roughly 2/3 of my total hops are going in FWH and I have been loving the results. FWH combined with an addition at 30-20min has been great for my less hoppy beers and for an Irish red it was FWH>45min>15min and I loved it. There isn't too much science to my method yet, maybe I willl have enough data compiled to understand my utilization better, but for now I kinda look at the recipe and try my best to decide how I should do them with the increased hop utilization we are supposed to be receiving.
I have a question on FWH. Do you remove the hops before you start boiling or leave them in the entire time?
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Old 05-10-2012, 02:56 PM   #1284
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Leave them in.

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Old 06-04-2012, 01:21 PM   #1285
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The caps for the cubes have a rubber washer. After use mold can grow between the cap and the washer. The washer needs to be removed, then the cap and the washer need to be Oxi-cleaned.

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Old 06-04-2012, 01:25 PM   #1286
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The caps for the cubes have a rubber washer. After use mold can grow between the cap and the washer. The washer needs to be removed, then the cap and the washer need to be Oxi-cleaned.
Ahhh makes sense. I think I'm just going to get a new cube anyway, but I'll remember that and will clean the cap separately.
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Old 06-05-2012, 06:39 AM   #1287
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I have been almost exclusively doing no-chill for all my batches. Unless there is some sort of external factor forcing me to chill right after brewing I always leave it overnight. Needless to say I have yet to have a bad beer from it.

I am curious what the ratio of cuber's vs. kettle chiller's are.

I just leave it overnight in the same kettle I boiled it in. I simply clean the lid and lock it down with alligator clips. It takes less then 24 hours (sometimes >16 hours during winter) to reach pitching temperatures at which point I move it into the primary and throw in the yeast.

Maybe I am missing something here, but what is the real advantage of the cube? I no chill because of sheer laziness, so moving near boiling hot wort from one container to another seems redundant if leaving it serves the same purpose.

Is it because in the hotter climates you may be required to leave it for several days before its ready for pitching?
Long time after the fact but I don't visit the forum much and as a long time no chill cuber, the info may be of use to someone.

The main advantages of cubing are:

-You can completely seal the cube, giving extra protection against infection.
-You can store the cube if you are not ready to ferment. I almost always pitch the next day or day after but I know some people who have successfully fermented a properly sealed cube up to a year later. Week before last I brewed and as I went to look for my wyeast smack pack, I realised I'd used it elsewhere and forgotten. Rather than pitch an inappropriate yeast, I was able to store the wort till I could get some ordered and delivered from the HBS.
-Additional advantage for me is that I ferment directly in mine (in AU, HDPE barrel fermenters are popular) so I like to remove it from the hot break (cold break is not an issue I'm troubled about as I rarely drink beer cold enough to get chill haze).

@ghpeel: I have had a couple of infections from cubes not sealing properly and I learned that there is a great advantage to lying the freshly filled cube on its side for ten or so minutes. If there is any leakage, you should see wort drops on the ground and can re-seal.
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Old 06-07-2012, 09:58 PM   #1288
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I do that anyway so that the hot wort will kill any nasties in/around the cap.

I've been no chilling for 12 months, and will quite often have 3 or 4 cubes stacked up, waiting to be fermented as I only have 2 fermenting fridges. I've left them for months and never, ever had an infection.

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Old 07-04-2012, 11:57 PM   #1289
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What would be the best no chill container to use for 2.5 gallon batches? Hopefully I can find something locally so I don't have to pay shipping.

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Old 07-05-2012, 01:36 PM   #1290
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What would be the best no chill container to use for 2.5 gallon batches? Hopefully I can find something locally so I don't have to pay shipping.
I use these. http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=22692&clickid=redirect


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