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Old 06-21-2012, 01:24 AM   #21
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I've done it dozens of times, with no particular regard for sanitation (I mean I don't do it right after eating a plate of nachos, but I certainly don't try to sanitize my hands) and it works great, never had a problem. That's some good stuff that's soaked up in those hops, and leaf hops hold a ton of beer.
I just wondered if squeezing the bag would force out unwanted flavors. I'm drinking an IPA right now that I dry hopped with whole leaf and it's nowhere near as hoppy as I expected. I didn't squeeze but noticed there was a whole lot of aroma when I removed the sock.

Think I'll try squeezing next time.

Thanks.
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Old 06-21-2012, 03:05 PM   #22
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I just wondered if squeezing the bag would force out unwanted flavors. I'm drinking an IPA right now that I dry hopped with whole leaf and it's nowhere near as hoppy as I expected. I didn't squeeze but noticed there was a whole lot of aroma when I removed the sock.

Think I'll try squeezing next time.

Thanks.
What type of hops??

Some hops are only bittering hops, while others are aroma hops, and even more cross both lines and are considered all-purpose hops.
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:43 PM   #23
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What type of hops??

Some hops are only bittering hops, while others are aroma hops, and even more cross both lines and are considered all-purpose hops.
I've never heard that before. Why would a hop variety be "only" bittering and another "only" aroma? That doesn't make any sense at all. If you want to use warrior hops for bittering, flavor, aroma, and dryhopping, that's fine. If you want to use saaz for all additions, that's fine too.

I think that some hops are listed as having a purpose, to make buying them easier perhaps, but to say that "some hops are only bittering hops or aroma hops" is ludicrous. That's not true, and it's terribly uninformed.
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:51 PM   #24
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I've never heard that before. Why would a hop variety be "only" bittering and another "only" aroma? That doesn't make any sense at all. If you want to use warrior hops for bittering, flavor, aroma, and dryhopping, that's fine. If you want to use saaz for all additions, that's fine too.

I think that some hops are listed as having a purpose, to make buying them easier perhaps, but to say that "some hops are only bittering hops or aroma hops" is ludicrous. That's not true, and it's terribly uninformed.
He has a point though. Some hops are way more aromatic than others. And IMO a hop like Magnum is almost completely useless for aroma purposes, but it's good for bittering. I don't buy it often because I prefer more versatile high alpha hops like Columbus, Warrior, or Apollo. You can use them anywhere you want with great results.... The reverse is true as well... Sure you could bitter with Amarillo, but it would be a waste to use it for bittering, and strip it of all of it's character, versus using it for it's excellent aroma.
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:13 PM   #25
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He has a point though. Some hops are way more aromatic than others. And IMO a hop like Magnum is almost completely useless for aroma purposes, but it's good for bittering. I don't buy it often because I prefer more versatile high alpha hops like Columbus, Warrior, or Apollo. You can use them anywhere you want with great results.... The reverse is true as well... Sure you could bitter with Amarillo, but it would be a waste to use it for bittering, and strip it of all of it's character, versus using it for it's excellent aroma.
Well, I guess my problem is with the way it's phrased, as "only bittering" or "only aroma". That's overly simplistic, and honestly not true. If someone is new, and reads that, they'd be terribly misinformed and I wanted to correct that.

The most wonderful German lagers use only "aroma" hops, when you think about it. Smooth and clean noble hops make a great bittering hop, as well as flavor and aroma hops. Maybe some hops don't have great aroma, but it's not that they are "only bittering" hops.
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:17 PM   #26
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Touché

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Old 01-06-2013, 02:43 AM   #27
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Throw the hops directly (i.e. no bags, filters, etc.) into Primary right after you pitch the yeast. Let sit in primary for no more than 14 days. Rack to secondary.

The beauty of Primary dry hopping is no dealing with bags, or mess in the secondary. When you racked from primary to secondary, you left the bulk of the solids behind (and what little remains will settle out in secondary).

I use a plastic bucket for primary, and a glass carboy for secondary. Much easier to clean out the hop remnants from the primary bucket than the mess that it leaves in the secondary. And nobody seems convinced that dry hopping during primary vs. secondary has any appreciable difference in taste.

Bottom line: Primary dry hopping works just fine, and the beer is delicious. Anything more complicated is just - well - more complicated. And who wants that.

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Old 01-09-2013, 07:26 PM   #28
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Throw the hops directly (i.e. no bags, filters, etc.) into Primary right after you pitch the yeast. Let sit in primary for no more than 14 days. Rack to secondary.

The beauty of Primary dry hopping is no dealing with bags, or mess in the secondary. When you racked from primary to secondary, you left the bulk of the solids behind (and what little remains will settle out in secondary).

I use a plastic bucket for primary, and a glass carboy for secondary. Much easier to clean out the hop remnants from the primary bucket than the mess that it leaves in the secondary. And nobody seems convinced that dry hopping during primary vs. secondary has any appreciable difference in taste.

Bottom line: Primary dry hopping works just fine, and the beer is delicious. Anything more complicated is just - well - more complicated. And who wants that.
This isn't a great idea because the co2 will drive off the aromatics of the hops. Not to mention hop oils will coat the yeast cell walls making it difficult for them to get things in/out of the cell. Just throw in the dry hops after fermentation has stopped.
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Old 01-12-2013, 11:54 PM   #29
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Hmmm... Never heard that, even from the pros. Besides, opening up the fermenter mid way thru primary to throw hops in just lets oxygen back in... kinda defeats the purpose of airlock?

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Old 01-13-2013, 12:39 AM   #30
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Hmmm... Never heard that, even from the pros. Besides, opening up the fermenter mid way thru primary to throw hops in just lets oxygen back in... kinda defeats the purpose of airlock?
if you open the fermenter carefully the layer of CO2 on your beer is so much more dense than the air that you won't be letting in much oxygen and what you do let in will float on top of the CO2. Drop the hops carefully so they don't disturb the CO2.
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