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Old 06-05-2010, 07:13 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Scooby_Brew View Post
I've never heard anybody advocating a "hot wort rest" before cooling. All the books I've ever read tell you to chill the wort down ASAP. I think you just simply misunderstood what they were saying.
That said, there is a growing movement amongst some home brewers who do not use any chilling methods, they simply let the wort sit and cool on it's own. That practise is a bit controversial though.
As I said above, this process of letting it sit 15 or 20 minutes before cooling is listed quite clearly in many of the recipes in Extreme Brewing. The book is in front of me right now. It is odd.
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Old 06-05-2010, 08:00 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
I'd say letting it sit, hot, would produce a lot of DMS in the beer.

John Palmer says DMS is produced when the wort is over 170F, but it is removed even more quickly by the action of the boil. So, if your wort is over 170 and you are not boiling, that's bad.

This was in the DMS episode of the Brew Strong podcast.

Of course, I regurgitate what I've read/heard, without much personal proof.
For all but the lightest malt there is very little SMM after 60 minutes of boil, for pilsner malt there wouldn't be much after 90. For something like munich malt there isn't much to start with.

The bigger issue is that a lot of DMS evolves during ale fermentation, a lot less during lager fermentation. It is pretty much impossible to get DMS in an ale if you boil 60 minutes (see Fix Principles of Brewing Science).

It's actually kinda hard to get DMS in a lager if you are trying to replicate continental lagers.

Almost every commercial brewery whirlpools hot for 30 minutes. I dunno about you guys, but I've never tasted DMS in a domestic ale. You also get more hop aroma that way.

The notion that one ought to cool fast comes from the commercial world where fast means 2 hours vs 36 hours. Homebrewers want to do better because they can, but the benefits are probably marginal at best when you are talking about 2 hours vs 10 minutes.
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Old 06-06-2010, 03:04 AM   #13
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The notion that one ought to cool fast comes from the commercial world where fast means 2 hours vs 36 hours. Homebrewers want to do better because they can, but the benefits are probably marginal at best when you are talking about 2 hours vs 10 minutes.
I always put the chiller (immersion) in the last 15" of the boil and as soon as I reach 0", put the hops, turn off the heat, and start the water flow, while I make the whirlpool. Am I wrong and I don´t need to do that in such a speedy way?
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Old 06-06-2010, 03:25 AM   #14
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I always put the chiller (immersion) in the last 15" of the boil and as soon as I reach 0", put the hops, turn off the heat, and start the water flow, while I make the whirlpool. Am I wrong and I don´t need to do that in such a speedy way?
I'm not here to say you are wrong or right, you would get more hop aroma if you waited to turn on the chiller. If you think you need more hop aroma, either use more hops or let them stand hot longer.
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Old 06-06-2010, 02:04 PM   #15
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I'm not here to say you are wrong or right, you would get more hop aroma if you waited to turn on the chiller. If you think you need more hop aroma, either use more hops or let them stand hot longer.
Oh. I´ve spent to much dry hop in my Amber Ale batches, cause the hop aroma never was as prominent as I desired. Will do another on next weekend and will wait to start to chill.
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Old 06-06-2010, 02:32 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by remilard View Post
I'm not here to say you are wrong or right, you would get more hop aroma if you waited to turn on the chiller. If you think you need more hop aroma, either use more hops or let them stand hot longer.
My personal experience is that you get the best hop aroma by ensuring your late additions (and dry hops) stay cold, not hot. Dry-hopping cold, in the keg, gives the absolute best for me. And sending your wort through a hop back is second best (for me) where the hot wort passes through the hop bed and immediately gets chilled to pitching temperature on the other side of the hop bed. Those oils are very volatile so letting the late additions sit hot for longer is not what should give you the best hop aroma.
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Old 06-06-2010, 02:50 PM   #17
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lately after my boil i wirlpool let the hot wort sit for 10-15 minutes then spry the top of the wort with starsan and spray a clean dry towel with starsan throw it over the pot and dont wory about it till the next night after it has cooled

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Old 06-06-2010, 03:00 PM   #18
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That's what I was thinking. The recipe creators are used to using a CFC or a plate chiller and going directly into the fermenter and are gearing their instructions toward that. That's the only way whirlpooling right after the boil would make any sense since if you were using a IC you'd end up stirring up your little whirlpool pile anyway.
I second that. It only makes sense to let it rest for the particulates to settle. Getting that wort to the sanitized fermenter quickly should be the goal IMO.
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Old 06-06-2010, 04:33 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by remilard View Post
I'm not here to say you are wrong or right, you would get more hop aroma if you waited to turn on the chiller. If you think you need more hop aroma, either use more hops or let them stand hot longer.
That doesn't make sense to me. Hop aroma is volatile, and the longer you let the aroma hops steep, the more aroma will be given off. Therefore, it would make more sense to me to cool as quickly as possible to keep the hop aroma.
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Old 06-06-2010, 04:36 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
I'd say letting it sit, hot, would produce a lot of DMS in the beer.

John Palmer says DMS is produced when the wort is over 170F, but it is removed even more quickly by the action of the boil. So, if your wort is over 170 and you are not boiling, that's bad.

This was in the DMS episode of the Brew Strong podcast.

Of course, I regurgitate what I've read/heard, without much personal proof.
I'm not well versed on DMS, but from what I thought I read somewhere, but later on in the mash the DMS precursors don't exist in a large enough quantity at the end of an hour-long boil to worry about it.

If I didn't read this somewhere, then I guess I dreamed it...
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