The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Does the bittering hop variety matter much?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-12-2012, 02:56 PM   #1
Boek
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: , Michigan
Posts: 107
Default Does the bittering hop variety matter much?

I know that the aa of the variety matters but besides that, what is the difference? If all the 60 min addition does is add bitterness can I just use whatever hop is lying around? Bitter is bitter right?

__________________
Boek is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 03:00 PM   #2
tjpfeister
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
tjpfeister's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Green Bay, WI
Posts: 490
Liked 20 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

Yes and no. Most hops will lose most of their flavor during the duration of the boil. Some hops, like Citra (I can personally assure you), will not.

__________________

The hardest part of all-grain brewing is arguing about it on the interwebs.
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Tims-C...9089362?ref=hl

tjpfeister is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 03:01 PM   #3
Psych
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kelowna, BC
Posts: 760
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

I'd think you're right, bitter is bitter...mostly. Some bittering hops can leave some flavor, I've found, even on a 60 minute boil. But that's mostly only noticeable if your only hopping at 60 and it's a light colored beer, like a pils or something.

Overall yeah, you can find the highest AA hop and use half an ounce of it no matter the style, bittering accomplished!

Psych is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 03:05 PM   #4
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,040
Liked 4197 Times on 3055 Posts
Likes Given: 778

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Psych View Post
I'd think you're right, bitter is bitter...mostly. Some bittering hops can leave some flavor, I've found, even on a 60 minute boil. But that's mostly only noticeable if your only hopping at 60 and it's a light colored beer, like a pils or something.

Overall yeah, you can find the highest AA hop and use half an ounce of it no matter the style, bittering accomplished!
That, and some hops are harsher than others. If you're making a German beer, for example, the reason to use noble hops and not something like Chinook is because of the cohumulone amounts. What I mean is, those noble hops have a low cohumulone content, so they are considered smoother for bittering. Chinook, for example, is a high cohumulone hop and is perceived as rough or harsh.

Two ounces of tettnang hops will never equal .75 ounce of chinook, even if the IBUs are the same! The cohumulone difference really comes through in cases like this.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 03:07 PM   #5
magno
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
magno's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 909
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Different hops have different bitterness to a certain extent. I usually buy my bittering hops by the pound and use the same neutral variety for several batches. I buy other bittering hops when a specific profile is desired.

__________________
Planning: New brewery at new house!!

Primary: Barley Wine

Secondary: Red Ale, Pale Ale

Conditioning:

Drinking: Brown Ale, 75 min. IPA, Oatmeal Stout, Poor Richard's Ale, Chocolate Cherry Stout
magno is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 05:34 PM   #6
Hermit
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Alternate Universe
Posts: 2,124
Liked 50 Times on 45 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

Personally, I have found that bitter seems to have different flavors. I'm not a big hops guys so maybe I'm just more sensitive to it. I can usually tell when Magnum hops have been used in my brew for a bitter and have picked out the flavor in some commercial beers.

__________________
Hermit is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 06:03 PM   #7
Psych
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kelowna, BC
Posts: 760
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
That, and some hops are harsher than others. If you're making a German beer, for example, the reason to use noble hops and not something like Chinook is because of the cohumulone amounts. What I mean is, those noble hops have a low cohumulone content, so they are considered smoother for bittering. Chinook, for example, is a high cohumulone hop and is perceived as rough or harsh.

Two ounces of tettnang hops will never equal .75 ounce of chinook, even if the IBUs are the same! The cohumulone difference really comes through in cases like this.
This is something I've briefly read about when I looked into hop farming, but haven't pursued much. Makes sense.

I just did an all Columbus Pilsner SMaSH ALE (breaking all the rules, tsk tsk) and the hop bitterness is indeed sharp and a bit rough around the edges. I expect it'll tone down, and it's not bad by any means, just...different.
__________________
Single vessel E-BIAB setup

Donor Fridge Fermentation Chamber
Psych is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 06:41 PM   #8
Brew-ta-sauraus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Parker, CO
Posts: 324
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I don't mean to get off subject here but i got a screaming deal on a pound of First Gold 8% Hops. ( they were liek $5 bucks additional to my bulk grain order). I would like to use them as bittering hops for several beers. What styles do you think they will work as bittering hops for?

__________________
Brew-ta-sauraus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 06:44 PM   #9
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,205
Liked 412 Times on 313 Posts
Likes Given: 466

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
That, and some hops are harsher than others. If you're making a German beer, for example, the reason to use noble hops and not something like Chinook is because of the cohumulone amounts. What I mean is, those noble hops have a low cohumulone content, so they are considered smoother for bittering. Chinook, for example, is a high cohumulone hop and is perceived as rough or harsh.

Two ounces of tettnang hops will never equal .75 ounce of chinook, even if the IBUs are the same! The cohumulone difference really comes through in cases like this.
Great answer!
__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2012, 07:21 PM   #10
rockfish42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Merced, CA
Posts: 814
Liked 18 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

There's also the matter of tannins, if you use EKG to bitter an IPA you'll have more vegetal matter in the kettle and that leads to a different flavor.

__________________
rockfish42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools