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Old 01-18-2012, 04:52 AM   #11
llamabox
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Is this a pooka from NC?

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Old 03-22-2012, 02:49 PM   #12
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The Ringwood Ale yeast is widely used in Brew Pubs for it's ability to produce outstanding Ale going from Brew to Glass in as little as 7 days. Fermentation is generally fast, 2 or 3 days fermented around 67-68°, a rise to mid 70's for a day or two diacetyl rest, Cold Crash (Clears very well without a need to filter) Keg, Carb and drink is my game plan for this Yeast.

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Old 09-05-2012, 09:27 PM   #13
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Wyeast London ESB (1968) also recommends a diacetyl rest: "A thorough diacetyl rest is recommended after fermentation is complete. Bright beers are easily achieved within days without any filtration. "

I currently have one fermenting at 68 degrees. I am going to let it go 2 full weeks and, assuming the gravity isn't dropping any more, I'll move it out to warmer part of the basement that is around 75 degrees.

Has anyone else ever worked with that yeast? Does that sound about right?

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Old 09-06-2012, 09:18 PM   #14
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I've worked with 1968 and never had an issue with diacetyl. Let the beer tell you what to do, not some predetermined schedule. A schedule only exists when you've fermented with a particular yeast for a number of times in the same type of beer. And only then is it just a guideline, the beer still makes the decision for you on what needs to be done.

That said, this yeast has a tendency to drop out, stall, or quit fermentation early if temperatures cool. This may require some rousing and/or temperature increases to help the yeast finish. Not only should you be doing SG checks (at 1 week, 2 week if you go that far, etc) to monitor fermentation (no airlock sniffing or bubble watching both of which are unreliable) you should taste your beer as well. You'll know when you need to continue fermentation with the above measures or not if you detect it. If you do detect diacetyl and FG has been reached or SG has stabilized, wait it out and the yeast often cleans it up. If it persists for a long time, you might have other issues (bacterial). I'm beginning to find with experience that if you pitched enough healthy yeast, keep your fermentation temps in line the first several days (pick a temp between 64-68F) and then allow temps to rise (up to 75F or more) I haven't needed to worry too much about off-flavors like diacetyl.

Short answer though, yes, you sound about right

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