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Old 04-27-2008, 08:53 PM   #1
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Default Diacetly rest with Ringwood Ale yeast

I've done plenty of searching, but come up with too much variation on how to do a diacetyl rest for an ale.

The beer is an all-grain brown ale modeled and modified after Dogfish Head's Indian Brown Ale.

10 gallon batch, fresh smack pack (blew up fast), and a 3 day, 4 cup starter using LME.

OG: 1.068
Gravity at day 7 (today): 1.041

Now the gravity progression is one issue as I would expect lower, but I've had cooler temperatures in the garage. It was pitched at an equalized 73 F, and has maintained temps in the mid to high 60s.

During the gravity check I gave the carboys a good stir to get things moving again.

So what to do? I've read with ales that require a diacetyl rest the primary should be extended anywhere from 2 days to 3 weeks after fermentation has stopped!

Options:

  1. Wait xx days after activity has slowed to 1 bubble every 1-2 minutes.
  2. Attempt to warm up the carboys with uncontrollable brewer belts to ~75 F for a couple days after activity has slowed.
  3. Do a 'dirty' transfer to pull a lot of yeast into the secondary and bring them inside which will raise the temp in the high 60s.
  4. ?

Any suggestions are appreciated.
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Old 04-28-2008, 12:05 AM   #2
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Diacetyl is not a problem for Ales. The temperature and malt types clean themselves up well at fermentation temperatures. Not to worry. Let it go 14 days in the primary and then keg or bottle. You do not need a secondary. Age in the keg or bottles 70F and try some at 1 month. It might be too sweet but will taste good at this point. More aging will fix the sweetness problem. Brown ales do take longer to age. At two months it should be really good.

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Old 04-28-2008, 11:54 PM   #3
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Actually Ringwood yeast is notorious for diacetyl production. Wyeast recommends a post fermentation diacetyl rest on their website. I've had good luck with the Ringwood by holding the fermentation temp in the mid 60's for two weeks as you have then bringing it up to the mid 70's for a few days. (I usually leave it in a warm closet in the house.) Then rack to secondary as usual.

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Old 04-29-2008, 09:20 PM   #4
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I did the same as raceskier. I had it in cool water in the basement for 8 days then brought it upstairs for several days before going to the secondary. Things turned out well. Was all this necessary? I don't know but it was suggested on their website.

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Old 04-30-2008, 01:56 PM   #5
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I agree. Give Ringwood a few days or so at 70-75, and you should be fine. It still might be worth a sample before bottling or kegging. Ringwood will clean up after itself, but it may take its time.


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Old 05-02-2008, 02:29 AM   #6
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Thanks for the tips. I added a little energizer to give it a kick. Hoping that will help.

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Old 05-02-2008, 02:38 AM   #7
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I did a low gravity brew once with this yeast and it was done (majority of the fermenting) in just 1 day! Amazingly fast working yeast this one. However, I did continue to let it rest in the fermenter for 2 weeks.

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Old 05-04-2008, 07:13 PM   #8
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Energizer is working like a charm. I think the diacetyl won't be a problem and the 041 gravity will have no problem getting down in the low 20's.

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Old 01-17-2012, 05:13 PM   #9
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I know this a pretty old thread, but I have a similar question.
I've only recently started brewing lagers, which has me more interested in diacetyl and its absence. I brewed a Southern English Brown, O.G. 1.036, temperature maintained high 60's low 70's. It's been 8 days now, vigorous fermentation subsided after three days (low gravity beer). Haven't checked the gravity again, but was the consensus here that after fermentation is complete, wait just an extra 2-3 days?
Thanks a lot.

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Old 01-17-2012, 05:14 PM   #10
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Just to be clear,
I realize that Southern English Brown is an ale. The comment about brewing lagers was only tangentially related.

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