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Old 12-08-2005, 08:25 PM   #11
trevlyn13
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I've drank a view of the microbrewed beers/ales, and I did enjoy those. The problem is, I live in Utah so it's basically impossible to get anything other than liquor that is above 3.2 abv. My goal is to ultimately set up a brewing process where I can produce something drinkable at about $.25 a bottle, at about 8-10% abv. I'm not doing it so much for the art and craft of it, but for the ability to customize and mass produce alcohol. How much am I looking at for starting costs if I want to go mid-high range equipment?



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Old 12-08-2005, 08:30 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by trevlyn13
How much am I looking at for starting costs if I want to go mid-high range equipment?

If you are looking to keep costs down, you'll want to go all grain instead of extract, but there's a big window there for mid-high range gear.

Anywhere from several hundred (mid range) to several thousand (high end) $'s.

-walker


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Old 12-08-2005, 10:34 PM   #13
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Or DIY with scrounged bits for £68 gpb

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Old 12-08-2005, 10:44 PM   #14
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Or go right to the farmer and purchase grain straight from the silo, can't get much cheaper than that. I think we are talking tons here.

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Old 12-08-2005, 10:47 PM   #15
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Or go right to the farmer and purchase grain straight from the silo, can't get much cheaper than that. I think we are talking tons here.
I've got a farmer friend offer it me for free but I don't fancy starting a malt house.
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Old 12-09-2005, 01:04 AM   #16
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you need to try a 10% alcohol beer before you try and brew one. besides the fact that higher gravity ales can be complicated, the taste is something that someone who says they don't enjoy beer probably won't like. that said its a fun and relatively easy hobby, but i don't know that wanting to mass-produce cheap high abv beer is a very good motive. i would try and find a barleywine or imperial stout somewhere before you waste your time or money on homebrewing.

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Old 12-09-2005, 03:04 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikey
You cannot make vodka without distillation. Whether this process is legal in your area or not is up to you.
Actually, whether the process is legal or not in your area has nothing to do with the individual, but with the law in that area. It is up to the individual to obey or not obey the law, but not to MAKE the law.
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Old 12-09-2005, 03:36 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Genghis77
I think the greatest problem with home brewing is the amount of trials to find the "ideal beer." Tastes are often limited to the major beers and maybe a small sampling of import and microbrews. Takes a while to home in on the right recipes. Looking back there have beeen disappointments, but never a truly bad batch. One really noticable thing is my increased craving of hops since I first started.
I think you will also find this to be the case - I know I have. I have yet to find my upper limit on hoppiness, each batch I go higher than the last, and it only seems to taste better.

About the only beer that really approaches the overall delicious-ness of my own brews is maybe Paulaner Hefeweizen - it's darn sure not a Bud! I started down this path a year ago, have made maybe ten batches and I can count on one hand the number of commercial beers I drank in my house since I cracked open my first bottle.

Edit - oops - forgot something - I did buy a case of Stoudt's Red Head Ale because I needed bottles and I liked the ones that it comes in. A fine brew but still not the equal of my own.

Home brewed beers are like sex - even the worst is great!
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Old 12-09-2005, 09:59 PM   #19
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Het trevlyn13 -

Back to your question about cost of equipment. Walker is correct that going all-grain will definitely lower the cost per beer. But it's my understanding that the all-grain process is more complicated and more time consuming than extract brewing. If you're serious about getting into the hobby, I would recommend doing at least a few extract batches first just to get familiar with the basic brewing process before diving into all-grain. I've brewed several batches of extract and still learn something new every time. I'll get to all-grain some day but I want to get there gradually. I worry that if you jump into all-grain right off the bat you might become frustrated and disillusioned with the whole thing. You might not be doing it "for the art and craft" but you should at least have fun doing it.

If you buy an intermediate extract kit you'll be able to use most (or all) of that equipment still when you get to all grain - you'll just be adding more equipment to the process. So it's not like you have to scrap it and start from scratch. I bought an intermediate kit from Midwest Supplies (www.midwestsupplies.com) along with 5 gal. brew kettle, some bottles, and a recipe kit for a little more than $200. (Remember, I live in BFE so shipping cost is substantial for me.)

But before you go out and buy this stuff you really should study up on the whole brewing process. There is a different thread on this forum that several people (including myself) have posted to about how much studying and prep we did before our first batches but there was still a lot we didn't know on first brew day.

Finally, I agree with drengel that you should try a 10% beer before you endeavor to brew it. Definitely an acquired taste . . .

My condolences on living in 3.2 Utah. I was in Colorado for my first time a few months ago and didn't know that you had to go to a liquor store to get beer that was above 3.2 (or a bottle of wine, for that matter). My wife and I walked into a grocery and found a little tiny cooler with about 3 different types of lager in it and finally a store clerk said it's all "three-two beer". Huh? Fortuneately I live in Oregon and the selection of microbrews available at the grocery store is pretty amazing - even in BFE.

AHU

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Old 12-09-2005, 10:03 PM   #20
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SteveM-

Ever tried Dogfishhead 120 Minute Imperial IPA? I thought I was like you but the hoppines of that beer tested my will. It was a $9 bottle of beer so I drank it, but I don't think I'll go down that road again. Possibly best served with a spoon . . .

AHU



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