Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Cooling Lager Prior to Yeast Pitch

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-13-2006, 09:39 PM   #11
boo boo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Hearts's Delight, Newfoundland
Posts: 4,171
Liked 30 Times on 26 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Doing a diacetyl rest usually depends on the strain of yeast used such as WY2308 but don't hurt to do for any lager since most of the fermentation is done by the time you bring up the temps to do the rest.

I think pitching an good starter at slightly below fermenting temps into wort at fermenting temps reduces the esters and fusels you'll get by pitching into warmer than recommended lager fermenting temperture wort.

I tried a recipie I brewed a while back using higher fermenting temps and got a good beer, but not a crisp lager.

__________________

How do you BBQ an elephant....first you get your elephant....

boo boo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-13-2006, 10:40 PM   #12
Dr Malt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 287
Liked 12 Times on 12 Posts

Default

Thanks Dantodd for the explanation. If you would like a little more information on diacetyl, you might go to http://brewingtechniques.com/library/backissue1.2/fix.html.

The temperature will have an effect on the rate of metabolism of the yeast and thus the rate of diacetyl formation, but fermenting at cooler temperatures will not inhibit the formation of diacetyl. Lager yeast will still make plenty of diacetyl at their optimum fermentation temperatures (50 -55 F). So, even if you start your fermentation at say 50 F, the fermenting beer will have high diacetyl levels during primary fermentation. Once the yeast have utilized most of the mono, di, and triose sugars, they will begin metabolizing the diacetyl and thus reducing the levels. Breweries do a diacetyl rest (warm the fermentation for a short time) to speed the assimilation of the diacetyl by the yeast so they can package and sell the beer sooner. If you are not in a hurry, you can let the beer sit at fermentation temperatures (50 -55 F) longer and the yeast will continue to lower the diacetyl levels below flavor threshold. Because diacetyl will be made in abundance anyway during primary fermentation, I am not convinced DiegoPro needs to go to great lengths to cool his wort to 55 F initially because of diacetyl. If he gets it to say 70 F, pitches his yeast and then places it at 55 F, he should not have a problem with diacetyl if he either ferments for sufficinet time or does a diacetyl rest.

Thanks.

Dr Malt

__________________
Dr Malt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2006, 06:14 PM   #13
DiegoProf
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 17
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Malt
Thanks Dantodd for the explanation. If you would like a little more information on diacetyl, you might go to http://brewingtechniques.com/library/backissue1.2/fix.html.
Thanks for the info! The link you supplied, though, seems broke. I found the article on my own though (you were missing an 's' in 'backissues'). Thanks for the reference. Here it is for everyone else:

http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue1.2/fix.html
__________________
DiegoProf is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gelatin in Lager Primary Prior to Keg... Evan! General Techniques 17 04-18-2011 09:35 PM
ups.. Cold crashed my lager prior to primary Elfmaze General Beer Discussion 4 09-12-2009 07:41 PM
Lager Bottling: Pitch New Yeast? cdanprice General Techniques 4 05-14-2008 02:06 AM
Should I remove some of the yeast cake prior to pitching on it? RegionalChaos General Techniques 10 03-28-2008 02:26 AM
Pitching New Yeast Prior to Bottling slushy1975 Bottling/Kegging 2 06-23-2006 12:35 PM