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-   -   Cold steep dark grains? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/cold-steep-dark-grains-96055/)

robertjohnson 01-05-2009 08:29 AM

Cold steep dark grains?
 
So, after an astringent brew or three I realized that precision with temperature and volume when steeping specialty grains is not to be totally overlooked, especially with the darker ones. I've since fixed my brewing process, but stumbled across this link with an interesting idea... http://www.jovialmonk.com.au/brewManual/Steeping_grains.pdf

how many people, if any, cold steep dark specialty grains? what have the results been?

cactusgarrett 01-05-2009 11:44 AM

I've done it previously and i've noticed it gives a noticably smoother taste. Less grain-bitterness and "bite".

Just this guy's opinion, though.

remilard 01-05-2009 12:52 PM

Seems like an interesting technique although I'm not sure cold steeping chocolate would be profoundly different than just using carafa, for example.

MinnesotaBrewed 01-05-2009 01:26 PM

The guy also mentions to squeeze the grains in the hop steeping method. I thought this was discouraged because it releases tannins and other unwanted flavors to the beer. Maybe specialty grains are the exception to this rule?

Either way I may have to give this a go if I ever use a large amount of dark, roasted malts.

lamarguy 01-05-2009 03:34 PM

Cold steeping grains will provide some flavor and color but you won't get any fermentables from it. So, to me, this is a waste of barley.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MinnesotaBrewed (Post 1043186)
The guy also mentions to squeeze the grains in the hop steeping method. I thought this was discouraged because it releases tannins and other unwanted flavors to the beer. Maybe specialty grains are the exception to this rule?

Myth. This has been discussed a thousand times - squeezing the bag does NOT result in tannin extraction. Sparging above 170F results in tannin extraction.

nosmatt 01-05-2009 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lamarguy (Post 1043404)
Cold steeping grains will provide some flavor and color but you won't get any fermentables from it. So, to me, this is a waste of barley.

if they are dark roasted grains, what sugar are you gonna get?

yesterday i brewed a irish stout kit my sister got me for xmas. i steeped in 35* water, and brought the temp to 140, then tossed em in the trash.

first time ever trying that (cold steep), and i dont PM brew really, unless somone buys me the kit :)

lamarguy 01-05-2009 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nosmatt (Post 1043425)
if they are dark roasted grains, what sugar are you gonna get?

You get lots of unfermentables and some fermentables. If you just cold steep the grains, my understanding is you get none of the above because there is no enzymatic activity at room temperature.

kaj030201 01-05-2009 04:07 PM

i add cold-brewed coffee whenever i am using coffee in a recipe. no harshness or bitterness at all, just smooth coffee flavor. i would imagine doing dark grains this way would be beneficial.

srm775 01-05-2009 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lamarguy (Post 1043440)
You get lots of unfermentables and some fermentables. If you just cold steep the grains, my understanding is you get none of the above because there is no enzymatic activity at room temperature.

The amount of fermentables is negligable with mashing dark grains like roasted barley or chocolate malts.

Cold-steeping darker grains does work and adds a nice smooth flavor without the astringencies you typically get with mashing and boiling. To be effective, you need at least twice the grain bill for the dark grains and you need to steep 18-24 hours. Add the dark grains at flame knockout.

However, using Carafa is just about the same thing and is a bit easier.

DeathBrewer 01-05-2009 04:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by srm775 (Post 1043461)
The amount of fermentables is negligable with mashing dark grains like roasted barley or chocolate malts.

quoted for emphasis


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