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Old 03-24-2006, 06:34 PM   #1
Beerdoc
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Default Cold secondary for German Ale

Let me know if this is a good idea: Wyeast German ale 1007(I think), went 2 weeks in primary, now in secondary. Beer was still very cloudy, so I put it into my new beer fridge along with my lager ( I did a side by side experiment) to chill a bit. The ale seems to have cleared even after 12 hours.

My thought is that it was still fermenting a little (SG was at 1.012 from 1.060, so not much fermenting was going on) and that I'd let it settle in cold temps for a while, raise the temp to 70F, stir up a little sediment as I prime it and then bottle.

Basic question is: can I hurt/kill the ale yeast with 40F prior to bottling? and is this a good idea to get clearer ale beer?

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Old 03-24-2006, 06:44 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beerdoc
Basic question is: can I hurt/kill the ale yeast with 40F prior to bottling? and is this a good idea to get clearer ale beer?
your yeast was refrigerated when you got it, right?
won't hurt it...just bring it back up to 70 when it's in the bottles...
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Old 03-24-2006, 06:44 PM   #3
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Never tried that. I normally cool condition the bottles once I am assured that I have carbonation. I bring them to the coldest part of the basement (low 50s) and take them out of the bottle box, and stand them right on the concrete floor for a couple weeks. This seems to help them clear up nice. Not sure what I am going to do in the spring-might be time to invest in a beer fridge.

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Old 03-24-2006, 07:05 PM   #4
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Thanks dudes. The more I think about it, I'll pull it back into room temp and let it go another week in secondary, then prime and condition like usual. My thought is that I just made the yeast go to sleep for a while. Meanwhile "there's beer to be made!".

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Old 03-24-2006, 07:46 PM   #5
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If it was done fermenting and you have the means, I'd recommend cold secondary fermentation for a German Ale. That's how it is done for Koelsch and Alt: primary fermentation on the coder side for ale yeast and cold lagering around freezing for 3+ weeks.

Kai

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Old 03-24-2006, 09:33 PM   #6
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OK, now I'll keep it cold. Thanks, Kai.

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Old 03-25-2006, 05:11 AM   #7
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Apparently Wyeast 1007 is one of the most difficult yeasts to clear. It doesn't flocculate well.

I've read somewhere that the only sure-fire way to clear a 1007 beer perfectly is to filter it. However I would have thought that cold conditioning it in a fridge close to freezing would do a decent job. This is how commercial alt and kolsch is treated.

I generally use Wyeast 1338 for my alt and kolsch style beers and cold condition in a keg for about 3 weeks and my beer is really clear.

JEM

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Old 03-25-2006, 10:57 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEM Australia

I generally use Wyeast 1338 for my alt and kolsch style beers and cold condition in a keg for about 3 weeks and my beer is really clear.

JEM
I have used Wyeast Kolsch 2565 a couple of times. The first batch was really cloudy. I made it in December and it didn't start to get good until about 2 months later. It finally got clear now after sitting in bottles for 4 1/2 months. Good beer, though, one of my best ever.
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