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Old 09-16-2011, 06:54 PM   #1
johnodon
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Default Cold Crashing Temp. vs. Storage Temp.

So here is my dilemma…

My keezer has 5 taps and I like to have 2 or 3 kegs waiting on-deck. I have just recently discovered the benefits of cold crashing. Is it a bad idea to cold crash a beer @ 40F and force carb and store it at 68F - 70F (since I don’t have any room in my keezer and no other means to keep it cool)?

I know temp fluctuation is bad for other liquids (especially milk) but didn’t know if the same rules apply to beer/alcohol.

TIA!

John

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Old 09-16-2011, 07:35 PM   #2
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Why not just rack it to the keg, hit it with co2 , purge, hit with more c02 and set it aside at 68-70f until you want to use it, then put it in the keezer?

You could force carb by shaking for 5 minutes if you wanted it ready and cold in a day.

Edit, I always cold crash my fermenter to settle out before racking.

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Old 09-16-2011, 07:54 PM   #3
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As long as you're storing your beer at room temp in a keg, you might as well naturally carbonate. In addition to the advantage of the beer being ready to serve as soon as you get it cold, active yeast in the keg will scavenge oxygen, reduce diacetyl, and metabolize acetaldehyde.

If you like hop character in your beer, you can even do something like a hop tea gyle.

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Old 09-16-2011, 07:59 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 944play View Post
As long as you're storing your beer at room temp in a keg, you might as well naturally carbonate. In addition to the advantage of the beer being ready to serve as soon as you get it cold, active yeast in the keg will scavenge oxygen, reduce diacetyl, and metabolize acetaldehyde.

If you like hop character in your beer, you can even do something like a hop tea gyle.
I almost suggested natural carbing, but us kegging guys normally try to avoid yeast in our finished product. In this case it is a great idea.
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Old 09-16-2011, 09:20 PM   #5
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But is there any concern about going form 40F (cold crash) to 70F (storage) and eventually back down to 37F (tapped)?

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Old 09-16-2011, 09:25 PM   #6
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But why the cold crash? I figured cold crash was always to settle and clear the beer...? I personally wouldn't warm it up after carbing, but can't say what it would do. Probably nothing as beer tastes fine from storeroom floor to cooler.

Actually curious on this myself now... I pulled a keg a while ago that was on tap for a bit cuz it wasn't great, it has been sitting for a couple weeks, wondering if I could chill it and use again... mmmm seems far fetched.

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Old 09-16-2011, 10:03 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSlash View Post
But why the cold crash? I figured cold crash was always to settle and clear the beer...? I personally wouldn't warm it up after carbing, but can't say what it would do. Probably nothing as beer tastes fine from storeroom floor to cooler.

Actually curious on this myself now... I pulled a keg a while ago that was on tap for a bit cuz it wasn't great, it has been sitting for a couple weeks, wondering if I could chill it and use again... mmmm seems far fetched.
As long as you were serving it using CO2, that really isn't much different from your "storeroom floor to cooler" statement...

Cheers!
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Old 09-17-2011, 04:23 AM   #8
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I've really not seen a lot of difference in clarity with my naturally carbonated kegs. My very clearest beer ever was a naturally carbonated keg of Tripel, in fact.

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Old 09-17-2011, 11:13 AM   #9
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Quote:
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I've really not seen a lot of difference in clarity with my naturally carbonated kegs.
I have definitely seen a MAJOR difference in clarity after cold crashing though. I wish I would have known about it sooner!

I'm still not clear going from cold to warm and back to cold is a bad thing though so I am going to be a little clearer about my proposed process.

I will cold crash the beer @ 40F for 2 or 3 days.

I will then rack to a keg.

I will force carb @ room temperature for ~3 days @ 68F.

I will then let the keg sit @ room temperature until I have an open tap (anywhere from a week to 3 months out).

I will then tap it @ 38F.

So, as you can see, the beer is going cold (cold crash) to warm (force carb and storage) and back to cold (tapped). I know going from cold to warm and back to cold with foods and liquids is usually a bad idea but I didn't know if that applies to beer that is fully carbed and in an airtight container.

John
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Old 09-17-2011, 12:12 PM   #10
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Agree with everything John says. The only difference in my routine is that I try to cold crash in the low 30's.

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