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Old 02-09-2013, 04:12 PM   #11
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What are your thoughts on cold crashing the Dubbel in the primary bucket? Is it necessary to rack to secondary before cold crash?

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Old 02-09-2013, 06:11 PM   #12
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Well since many of us don't use secondaries, and opt for a month long primary instead, AND we cold crash....I think you can draw your own conclusions....

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Old 02-09-2013, 06:55 PM   #13
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Ok, sorry to sound dumb, but I'm just making sure I'm getting it right, because everybody has different methods, and they change depending on which thread you read.
1 month in primary at 66-70 degrees, then cold crash around 35 for 2 weeks in primary, then bottle and leave them in dark corner for as long as I can stand it. Sound right?

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Old 02-09-2013, 07:00 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeetaman View Post
What are your thoughts on cold crashing the Dubbel in the primary bucket? Is it necessary to rack to secondary before cold crash?
If its a high gravity beer, and you plan to lager it for a while, you should consider transferring it to a carboy.

The flavors mature nicely with a few weeks of aging, but you can also complete primary fermentation, bottle it, and then cold condition in the bottles.
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Old 02-09-2013, 07:04 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeetaman View Post
Ok, sorry to sound dumb, but I'm just making sure I'm getting it right, because everybody has different methods, and they change depending on which thread you read.
1 month in primary at 66-70 degrees, then cold crash around 35 for 2 weeks in primary, then bottle and leave them in dark corner for as long as I can stand it. Sound right?
There is no "best way." What you described will work. My preference is about 3 weeks primary, 1-3 weeks secondary as cold as possible (I put it outside in a box when temps are >25F. Then bottle with a little fresh yeast added (I like Wyeast 3522 or 1388), bottle condition for a weeks.
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Old 02-09-2013, 07:11 PM   #16
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I fear transferring to a secondary because I read that if you are a beginner and don't quite know what you are doing then you can oxidize your beer. This is batch #2 for me so I am most assuredly a beginner.

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Old 02-09-2013, 08:39 PM   #17
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I fear transferring to a secondary because I read that if you are a beginner and don't quite know what you are doing then you can oxidize your beer. This is batch #2 for me so I am most assuredly a beginner.
You are correct. It is a small risk unless done correctly, but the process isn't impossible to master. If you practice it, it's quite manageable. If you want to keep it simple, leaving it in one container is safest.
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:05 PM   #18
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Lagering is cold conditioning, and that obviously is with a lager yeast....that is active in cold conditions.
Sorry, Revvy, but lagering takes place at near freezing temperatures, and lager yeast certainly aren't active at 33F. Lagering is for precipitating out mildly-soluble compounds like polyphenols that detract from a crisp, clean flavor. Many ales will benefit from a lagering period as well (see: altbier) as the yeast has nothing to do with this process.

Cold conditioning any beer at warmer than lagering temps (say fridge/serving temps) could serve to drop out more yeast giving you a sparkling clear beer and totally remove any yeastiness that may remain after racking.

Many homebrewers may benefit more by leaving their carbonated beer in the fridge an extra week or two rather than leaving it in the primary for that time to pick up more yeast character, as that "homebrew taste" is often attributed to excess yeast in the finished beer.
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:30 PM   #19
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Definitely going to agree with daksin.

Cold conditioning is specifically a process for ales, as when you do it with a lager it's called lagering. It's not about the yeast doing anything - you should be giving them enough time to do their job before you condition - now it's about getting the yeast as well as some proteins and other substances to drop out of the beer. I'll leave the rest of the explaining to Palmer as he does a better job than I:

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Originally Posted by John Palmer How to Brew Chapter 8.3
Towards the end of secondary fermentation, the suspended yeast flocculates (settles out) and the beer clears. High molecular weight proteins also settle out during this stage. Tannin/phenol compounds will bind with the proteins and also settle out, greatly smoothing the taste of the beer. This process can be helped by chilling the beer, very similar to the lagering process. In the case of ales, this process is referred to as Cold Conditioning, and is a popular practice at most brewpubs and microbreweries. Cold conditioning for a week clears the beer with or without the use of finings.
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Old 02-12-2013, 01:07 AM   #20
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I have an additional question. I have an Irish Red Ale that I would like to try my first attempt at cold crashing as I forgot to add Irish moss. I have a chest freezer and plan to put the secondary in there at about 35 for a few days or so. My question is the next step is bottling. When I am ready to bottle do I let the beer warm up to room temperature before adding priming sugar and then bottle or leave it cold?

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