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Old 02-08-2013, 10:46 PM   #1
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Default Cold Conditioning

Hey everyone. I'm new to home brewing and this is my first time posting on this site. Can anyone help me out with how to cold condition a Belgian Dubbel?

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Old 02-08-2013, 11:00 PM   #2
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There are many ways to do this, but for my .02 I cold condition in secondary ferment for 60+ days at cellar (55F) or cooler. I then bottle with yeast, do a 2 week conditioning at 75F to carbonate then lay the bottles down (figuratively) for a few weeks to months at cellar temp. Gets better with time.

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Old 02-08-2013, 11:09 PM   #3
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I put my secondary carboy in the fridge at around 37F for 2 weeks, then keg and/or bottle. It helps clear the beer and I find it improves the taste too. After that, the beer is all clear.

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Old 02-08-2013, 11:11 PM   #4
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With ales there really is not such thing as "cold conditioning." Conditioning relies on yeast activity to a great extent. Ale yeast operates in a pretty warm temp range from the low 50's to the 90's (for some yeasts like Saison.) When you get cooler than a yeasts lowest temps, the yeast, quite frankly, goes to sleep.....if you're asleep do you accomplish anything? Neither do the yeasts. They go dormant, and the beer doesn't "condition." In fact it just sits there, and ages with little or no change.

All cooling off ale yeast does is let it fall out of suspension...we cold crash to CLEAR our beers. But the flavors don't get altered...just that the beer gets less yeasty tasting...

Lagering is cold conditioning, and that obviously is with a lager yeast....that is active in cold conditions.

What are you trying to accomplish with your beer? If you want the flavors to come together, then leave the beer at room temps til you're happy with the flavor.

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Old 02-08-2013, 11:42 PM   #5
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I'm just new to the process and so I'm just trying to figure things out. So cold crashing is basically for clarity? Do you need to re-pitch yeast to bottle it if you drop the yeast out of suspension?

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Old 02-08-2013, 11:45 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeetaman View Post
I'm just new to the process and so I'm just trying to figure things out. So cold crashing is basically for clarity? Do you need to re-pitch yeast to bottle it if you drop the yeast out of suspension?
Some do some don't. Depends on the gravity and how patient you are. I usually re-yeast my beers which are north of 1.060... which is what I normally brew...
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Old 02-08-2013, 11:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeetaman View Post
I'm just new to the process and so I'm just trying to figure things out. So cold crashing is basically for clarity? Do you need to re-pitch yeast to bottle it if you drop the yeast out of suspension?
THere's still enough yeast to carbonate beer even with cold crashing.
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Old 02-08-2013, 11:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
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THere's still enough yeast to carbonate beer even with cold crashing.
Appreciate this. I have a Kolsch cold conditioning for 2 weeks @ 45° and I was wondering the same thing.
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Old 02-09-2013, 12:39 AM   #9
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How long/cold do you crash a Belgian Dubbel? Generally/preferentially speaking

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Old 02-09-2013, 12:44 AM   #10
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As close to freezing as you can get (but don't let it freeze) for two weeks is good. 4 weeks is better!

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