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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Closed-system pressurized fermentation technique!
View Poll Results: What do you guys think about pressure fermentations? Time for a poll.
I've done it and I liked it just fine! 82 11.25%
I've done it, nothing wrong with it, but prefer normal fermentation techniques. 20 2.74%
I've done it, hate it, and never will do it again! 4 0.55%
I've never done it, but it is on my list! 544 74.62%
I've never done anything. I only brew beer in my mind. 79 10.84%
Voters: 729. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-12-2010, 04:52 AM   #441
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Originally Posted by Dgonza9 View Post
I have some of those. I just didn't think of it for a gas line. I removed the gray rubber check valve and used the o-ring. Everything seems good. Gonna test it some more, though.

FYI, I think my other problem with a leaky manifold may have been caused by putting teflon tape on the flared fittings. That's a no no.

Thanks for the help.
No problem man, glad I could help. Yep, you're right about the teflon tape. The two flare surfaces are what actually make the seal. The thread is just a mechanical fastener that provides the force to seal both surfaces together. On my flare connections, I use little nylon washers to eliminate having to torque the connection down excessively. Midwest sells 'em, but they're kinda expensive.



http://www.kegkits.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=W-20-12&Category_Code=
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Old 10-12-2010, 04:08 PM   #442
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Woo-hoo! The second brewing of an easy lager is holding at 26.5 psi @55*F after 2 weeks and 2 days on a whole-cake pitch. She started off very slow at 50*F, and I didn't see anything more noticeable than a little psst from the tap connector relief valve for the first week. I pitched the beer in on top of the cake (highly aerated) after the fast chill down to about 45*F. I had my freezer set on 45*F prior a couple of days, but noticed that the night before brewday the ETC read 76*F.

Somehow the sensor got smashed and wasn't letting the Love ETC control the freezer. So, the yeast in just a couple of days went from 45*F to 76*F and then back to 45*F thanks to a spare Ranco (gotta love them). So, now I set the Ranco the night before brewing and what happens... I get up the next morning to a sloshy quart of yeast cake. Seems my new temperature probe's tape got too much condensation from the keg sweating, and so swung into the air. Ok, so now I have to just turn off the freezer and open the door hoping to get close to 45*F (thinking that might help with the beating they have just taken) before I pitched on top of it.

The mash went well, with the exception to lots of stirring from filling from the top. My system just works better with bottom feed to lift the dry stuff up to be stirred easier. I usually just stirred a bit and could feel it was fine, not so with the top fill. Once I was not as worried about dough balls, I started my 2 hour mash schedule at 148*F for the whole two hours with a thin mash almost 2qt/#. Set back, and went on worrying about my yeasts health.

Perfect wort, low eighties efficency, and a nice "hop addition hot break volcano" later... I am pumped to 100% commitment to go ahead and pitch and hope for the best. This was a 12.25 gallon recipe that had top up water to achieve a final batch size of 15 gallons (added pre-boiled/RT water at flame-out). Now I have 1.049 wort, and 15 gallons of it! I recirculate with tap water, while aerating, with a Venturi on the return to kettle. Once I am at tap temps, I swap over to ice water recirculation and drive the wort to 45*F. The wort was frothy like a big mug of rootbeer, so I transferred the whole mess into my fermenter and closed the keg. Attached my spunding valve a full 24 hours later, and had nothing. Pulled the tap relief and pfft. Ok, that makes me feel better... and then the wait.

So, here I am this much later from pitch (and using a pressurized system for Pete's sake) and I have no pressure. So, I leave on the 7th and decide to turn up the ferment to 55*F, and 3 days later I have over 20 psi. Guess it woke up???

Now, we let her go and log when she's done. She's at carbonation pressure and seems to be producing quit a bit of neutral beer smells from the constant hiss you can hear. I think the second I check with no hiss, I will ramp the beer up another 5*F a day to 75*F for 3 days, check the gravity, and start crashing 5*F a day until I get to rest of 35*F for 2 weeks. Then I transfer into serving kegs.

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Old 10-12-2010, 04:28 PM   #443
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I'm sure it's been talked about somewhere in this thread, but where would I find the posts dealing with exactly how the pressure affects the fermentation, how best to utilize it (pressures, temperatures), and maybe a little of the science behind it?

All this discussion is awesome, but I'd like to learn more about this technique.

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Old 10-12-2010, 04:33 PM   #444
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I'm sure it's been talked about somewhere in this thread, but where would I find the posts dealing with exactly how the pressure affects the fermentation, how best to utilize it (pressures, temperatures), and maybe a little of the science behind it?
It's sprinkled throughout the thread. Here is a post of relevant papers and advantages/disadvantages of the technique.
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Old 10-12-2010, 05:00 PM   #445
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Digging through the thread is the only way really. I do it different every time, but the basics of how it works/why people would use it are easy enough to explain. By fermenting under pressure, you are basically equating your fermenter into a large unitank; as far as how the beer feels about it any ways. The beer will have a higher hydrostatic pressure, the yeast will slow down growth a little bit. This lessened yeast growth is suppose to help with esters and fusel alcohol production, which is why lager yeasts make cleaner tasting beers. I believe pressure raises diacetyl though, or at least faster detection only to be cleaned up faster as well when under pressure. This could be due to the ability to ferment it at slightly higher temperatures without the typical side-effects of doing so when not under pressure. Also, it can give you 100% natural carbonation at the end of your primary fermentation, which I believe gives me a better CO2 bubble. Just from what I witness from my process, which is constantly changing.

I'm looking to do a beer at RT sealed up in a keg under full carbonation level setting of spunding valve. I will pull the relief at the beginning, but will let it vent the rest out as it is built from that point on. I'm trying this easy way to see if it works on a beer I have been crafting for a while. If it tastes good enough to be my house ale, how easy to not have to worry about temperature control so much. We will see.

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Old 10-12-2010, 11:19 PM   #446
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Originally Posted by GNBrews View Post
No problem man, glad I could help. Yep, you're right about the teflon tape. The two flare surfaces are what actually make the seal. The thread is just a mechanical fastener that provides the force to seal both surfaces together. On my flare connections, I use little nylon washers to eliminate having to torque the connection down excessively. Midwest sells 'em, but they're kinda expensive.



http://www.kegkits.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=W-20-12&Category_Code=
I picked up a couple of those. Everything's looking good and ready for the maiden voyage this Saturday. Gonna brew Biermuncher's Centennial Blonde.

Cheers! Thanks again.
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Old 10-14-2010, 01:34 AM   #447
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I'm brewin' my brown this weekend as well. Can't wait to try a RT fermentation with PacMan.

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Old 10-15-2010, 09:50 PM   #448
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Woohoo, I have lift-off from bottle dregs for my PacMan starter. Hopefully I'm brewing tomorrow.

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Old 10-16-2010, 06:22 PM   #449
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Default Is cutting the dip tube in sanke necessary?

I was getting ready to trim about 3/4" off my sanke dip tube, but part of me doesn't want to do it. I'm planning on running cleaning and sanitizing solutions from my keggle and CFC to the keg and then pushing them out with pressure. I don't want to leave a lot in the keg bottom and then have to disassemble the valve to get the remainder out right before transferring the wort.

If I just draw off some of the yeast cake until the wort is clear, do you think I can forgo cutting the dip tube?

Thanks for the advice. Maiden voyage tomorrow!

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Old 10-16-2010, 06:33 PM   #450
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You don't have to cut the tube. I did and I don't have much to worry about, but it leaves a quart of sediment/liquid behind when emptied. If you left it, you may get more sediment during transfer... but it will only be a little bit more. I want to throw in that I turn my kegs upside-down while connected to the tap connector (but not actually tapped) to empty completely through the gas port (with the check valve removed of course). I do this when sanitizing my kegs. I Star-San about a gallon inside a sealed up keg and then purge with a little CO2. While there is still a bit of CO2 pressure, I turn them upside-down and tap the keg (pull the handle down to activate) then a sneeze of sanitizer comes out leaving nothing in the keg.

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