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View Poll Results: What do you guys think about pressure fermentations? Time for a poll.
I've done it and I liked it just fine! 82 11.34%
I've done it, nothing wrong with it, but prefer normal fermentation techniques. 20 2.77%
I've done it, hate it, and never will do it again! 4 0.55%
I've never done it, but it is on my list! 538 74.41%
I've never done anything. I only brew beer in my mind. 79 10.93%
Voters: 723. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-04-2011, 06:55 PM   #1061
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I liked it when I pressurized my fermentor with pure O2. I shook it though, so I don't know how much would get into suspension with doing it as you did. I bet it works like a charm though.

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Old 11-04-2011, 07:01 PM   #1062
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Originally Posted by WortMonger View Post
I liked it when I pressurized my fermentor with pure O2. I shook it though, so I don't know how much would get into suspension with doing it as you did. I bet it works like a charm though.
Yeah, I thought about shaking after the fact, but the headspace pressure had equalized after an hour or so, which makes me think that the bulk went into solution. I'm pretty sure I don't have a leak.
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Old 11-04-2011, 07:28 PM   #1063
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Let us know as soon as you see activity via your pressure gauge. I can't wait for you to get as excited as I did the first time.

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Old 11-04-2011, 08:44 PM   #1064
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That is kind of how I make my starters, in my 3 gal corny. I don't bother breaking out the sintered stone to dose the wort. I just seal up the corny and pressurize it with O2. Shake a bunch and put the spunding valve on it at say 3 PSI or so and let the starter eat oxygen under pressure until it's sending out CO2.

It's certainly not the usual and I have no idea if this means anything good or bad to yeast development. Works for me though and I don't have to bother with the stone.

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Old 11-04-2011, 08:53 PM   #1065
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However, some helpful ideas for Sanke (you've probably considered some of these) You can do what I did and dry hop in the serving keg. Which, at room temperature, is good for 7 days or so. But at serving temps (or colder), the aroma is slower to develop. I remember a NG Crack'd Wheat clone that took a little over 2 weeks to reach full aroma...and it never got grassy.

For you, if you dry hop for 5 days, then crash cool, you probably have a bonus 2 days, maybe more if you're close to freezing, meaning a 9-11 day dry hop might be closer to the aroma you'd get from 7 days at 75˚.
Thanks for the suggestions. I have dry hopped cold and warm and I'm not sure if there's a difference, but I'll have to try an extended dry hop and see what happens. It's true thought that the hop character does change a lot from day to day and it's hard to attribute it to one thing or another.

California V is taking forever to drop out, though, from the starter wort to the final beer. Not sure why. My water is fine. I don't use any finings really and might start now.
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Old 11-04-2011, 11:49 PM   #1066
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I have been seriously considering gelatin in the future. Just seems so easy to use, plus easy enough to inject under CO2 pressure into the keg. We'll see though. Time is really worth it, and if you have beer to drink in the mean time... you don't even worry about it.

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Old 11-05-2011, 10:54 AM   #1067
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Wort, do you serve from your fermenter? I can't remember and I'm not about to go through 107 pages.

Lager update, my Novemberfest is pouring right now and it's gorgeous. Brewed on 10/1 and poured on 10/3. It would have benefitted from a decoction mash for more body in the lager, but it is quaffable already. I love pressure fermentation.

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Old 11-05-2011, 12:42 PM   #1068
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Let us know as soon as you see activity via your pressure gauge. I can't wait for you to get as excited as I did the first time.
I woke up this morning to find a gentle hiss and ten pounds of pressure! I'm still trying to figure out how many valve turns equals how many psi, but somehow I ended up exactly where I wanted to be on my first shot. Thanks for your help everyone, and WortMonger...you're enthusiasm is infections

I know that the pressure will slow down yeast activity and that many people bump up the temperature to compensate. Certainly, the exact contours here will vary from system to system, but until I get a feel for things does anyone have a rule of thumb? If I'm starting out at 10 psi and gradually ramping up to 25, how much do I want to raise my temperatures to get a roughly equivalent fermentation?
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Old 11-05-2011, 03:12 PM   #1069
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I've got 10 gal of BM's Centennial Blonde that just finished up pressurized fermentation. It is split between 2 cornies with my spunding valve connected to a tee between the two liquid ports. I am thinking about using gelatin, but am undecided about how to go about it. The way I see it I can: 1) add the gelatin directly to these corny kegs, cold crash, then transfer to serving kegs. 2) transfer, add gelatin, cold crash, transfer again 3) or some other combination of steps. What metod would you guys suggest for ending up with a good balance of the least amount of sediment in the serving kegs with the least amount of work. Basically, I am just looking to have serving kegs that will not take too long to pour clear after transporting.

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Old 11-05-2011, 03:12 PM   #1070
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flananuts View Post
Wort, do you serve from your fermenter? I can't remember and I'm not about to go through 107 pages.

Lager update, my Novemberfest is pouring right now and it's gorgeous. Brewed on 10/1 and poured on 10/3. It would have benefitted from a decoction mash for more body in the lager, but it is quaffable already. I love pressure fermentation.
I have served from my fermentor before, but that was just to see if I could. I wouldn't recommend doing so due to that much yeast, but it worked just fine.

I assume you meant 10/1 and poured 11/3, right? Otherwise, that would be the fastest lager I have ever heard of, lol. I loved the flavors I got from a decoction. I once did a triple on a APA and it was heaven in a glass. I used my pressure canner to cook the mash and used it like a double boiler, with a large mixing bowl inside.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalFet View Post
I woke up this morning to find a gentle hiss and ten pounds of pressure! I'm still trying to figure out how many valve turns equals how many psi, but somehow I ended up exactly where I wanted to be on my first shot. Thanks for your help everyone, and WortMonger...you're enthusiasm is infections

I know that the pressure will slow down yeast activity and that many people bump up the temperature to compensate. Certainly, the exact contours here will vary from system to system, but until I get a feel for things does anyone have a rule of thumb? If I'm starting out at 10 psi and gradually ramping up to 25, how much do I want to raise my temperatures to get a roughly equivalent fermentation?
I wouldn't bump up anything until you are a few days in. 10 psi is where I used to start and would stay there until the very end. Then I would let my pressure build to wanted volumes and leave it alone until it was done. Now I do bump my temperature up about 4 degrees after the majority of yeast has done its job as a insurance policy against diacetyl, as well as speeding up the finish.

I hope my enthusiasm helps others try this and after that, I hope they love it as much as I do. This system is great, and is actually easier for me than the normal way of doing things. Sure I can't see what is going on, but it has made me trust my procedures as a brewer. Kinda like flying an airplane by instrumentation only... scary, but if you trust your instruments it is possible.
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