Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Big lager yeast starter
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-22-2009, 04:47 AM   #1
steelerguy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Stony Brook, NY
Posts: 486
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Big lager yeast starter

I am going to be brewing a doppelbock next weekend and I need to start thinking about the starter. I have one smack pack of Wyeast 2206 Bavarian Lager. I am going to be shooting for around 1.085 for the OG and will need about 600 billion little yeasties working for me.

Using the Wyeast pitching rate calculator it seems like doing a two step starter. 1.33 quarts let it go for 24 hours, then add 2.66 quarts, and let it go for another 24 hours. That into my wort should give me enough yeast.

For those of you who have brewed large lagers before, does this sound about right? I was thinking I could do that process twice if needed, saving the yeast from the first run in a jar in the fridge while I make another starter. Then combine and pitch when ready. Don't want to do that though if just one run though should be enough. What say you lager brewers?

__________________
steelerguy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-22-2009, 05:19 AM   #2
brewmasterpa
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: orange, ca
Posts: 797
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

ya know, i never pay attention to pitch rates. depending on what my og is, and how big a batch im doing, i just guestimate on my rampup. im doing a 10 gallon american wheat tomorrow that has an og just about 1.060, and i used one wyeast 1010 and tripled the starter. dont know how much yeast, dont know a pitch rate, didnt measure my water or dme, but i can guarantee you that by the size of the yeast cake i have now, itll go nuclear in about 6 hours.

__________________

ill keep my money, guns, freedom, and religion......you can keep the change.

You like fishsticks, what are you, a gay fish?

brewmasterpa is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2009, 07:53 PM   #3
brewmasterpa
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: orange, ca
Posts: 797
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

so just an update on that wheat beer starter, yeah i pitched it, and by hour 6 i had kraussen flowing all over the place out the airlock. just make a substantial starter that you feel will be relevant to your og and batch size. i suppose its time to make a blowoff tube setup because thats the 4th batch in a row that ive had a nuclear starter.

__________________

ill keep my money, guns, freedom, and religion......you can keep the change.

You like fishsticks, what are you, a gay fish?

brewmasterpa is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2009, 10:28 PM   #4
Got Trub?
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,538
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Uhhh... you do know that overpitching can be as much of a problem as underpitching. There is a reason that professional brewers spend time and energy on pitching the right amount of yeast. Its not as if they don't have enough around.

GT

__________________
Got Trub? is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2009, 04:58 AM   #5
brewmasterpa
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: orange, ca
Posts: 797
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

this be the case, understood. however, i didnt just throw the whole boat in, i ramped my starter up in three steps from one pack of yeast so i could pitch it in a 10 gallon batch that was split into 2 5-gallon buckets. i wasnt suggesting to just throw however much you want in, as a matter of fact, just do a gallon starter. hell use a 5 gallon buckets worth. i was simply insinuating that some people are way too damn scientific about this stuff. just make what you think should do the trick and pitch it. and in my case, use a blowoff tube.

__________________

ill keep my money, guns, freedom, and religion......you can keep the change.

You like fishsticks, what are you, a gay fish?

brewmasterpa is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2009, 06:33 AM   #6
HotbreakHotel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 352
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I just did a baltic porter that started at 1.092. I used a starter, but it wasn't big enough and it petered out around 1.040. Luckily I had a Schwarzbier coming off a yeast cake and dumped a bunch of that in and it finished out great. I say go big, just grow as much as you can before brew day.

I know there's such a thing as too much, but for lagers I think it's better to err on the side of more. I was a little worried about excess yeast, so I just racked off the yeast cake as soon as it slowed down.

__________________
HotbreakHotel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2009, 03:19 PM   #7
brewmasterpa
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: orange, ca
Posts: 797
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

going a little bit big and blowing some off is better than not enough, having 48 hours of infectious lag time, and not attenuating to your final properly. but thats just my observation and ive never had a drain cleaner batch so i think my method of madness is effective.

__________________

ill keep my money, guns, freedom, and religion......you can keep the change.

You like fishsticks, what are you, a gay fish?

brewmasterpa is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-27-2009, 04:18 AM   #8
steelerguy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Stony Brook, NY
Posts: 486
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Yeah, considering the mrmalty.com calculator said I needed 6 smack packs of yeast with no starter I figured I better go big!

I did a 1 quart starter for 24 hours, then added 3 more quarts for another 24. This yeast was just going through the sugar like mad! By 24 hours it had flocculated and krausen was gone. Just popped it in the fridge, a good amount of yeast on the bottom. I will decant Saturday night, and let it warm up to fermentation temp and add another 2 liters of wort and let it go at 50 degrees which should get me a little more growth and it will be ready to keep reproducing when it hits the 5 gallons of wort....at least I hope so!

__________________
steelerguy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-28-2009, 04:28 AM   #9
Got Trub?
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,538
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HotbreakHotel View Post
I just did a baltic porter that started at 1.092. I used a starter, but it wasn't big enough and it petered out around 1.040. Luckily I had a Schwarzbier coming off a yeast cake and dumped a bunch of that in and it finished out great. I say go big, just grow as much as you can before brew day.

I know there's such a thing as too much, but for lagers I think it's better to err on the side of more. I was a little worried about excess yeast, so I just racked off the yeast cake as soon as it slowed down.
I agree about the lagers. For big ones (dopplebock) I brew something like a boh pils at SG 1.045 and then use about 1/2 the resulting yeast cake to pitch the dopplebock. You treat the little beer like its a big starter...

GT
__________________
Got Trub? is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-01-2009, 04:07 AM   #10
steelerguy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Stony Brook, NY
Posts: 486
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I did crash cool the starter, the yeast hit the bottom fast. Let it cool for 36 hours and decanted before I started to brew. Added 2 liters 1.040 wort and let it start working on that at fermentation temp, 50 degrees. After a few hours I could see it producing some C02. It went for about 13 hours, which is when I had my doppelbock down to 52 and ready to pitch.

Pitched the starter and 7 hours later it was working very slowly at 50. Checked again at 15 hours and it was chugging away with a nice 1/2" layer of krausen and a tiny bit of yeast on top. At 21 hours it was 3/4" of krausen and a lot of yeast on the top. At 48 hours it looks like someone blew a load of diarrhea into my carboy and I am trying to process it...not pretty. Can't say the freezer it is in smells to good either, and if you put your head in there to check it out the C02 burns your nose....a very pleasant experience!

__________________

steelerguy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lager yeast starter Jaybird General Techniques 17 11-08-2012 06:28 PM
Yeast starter for a lager sdbrew1024 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 11 05-11-2009 05:00 AM
do i need to lager my yeast starter? Warpig75 General Beer Discussion 7 12-06-2008 11:54 PM
Lager Yeast starter? Gabe General Techniques 5 03-30-2008 03:42 AM
Lager Yeast Starter Evets General Techniques 2 10-16-2006 10:10 AM