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Old 02-19-2010, 08:57 PM   #1
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Default Big beer and bottle conditioning

I brewed a 1.125 barleywine 3 weeks ago. I have yet to check the sg but it appears fermentation has ceased. I was planning on putting this beer in secondary for ~ a month then crash cooling it for a week and bottling it. Do i need to add yeast to this beer at bottling time? I am hoping it finished around 1.028 so it will be around 13% alcohol. I used pacman yeast in the primary ferment.

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Old 02-19-2010, 09:36 PM   #2
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You shouldn't need extra yeast if you're only putting it in secondary for a month. If you're worried, you can mix up a teaspoon of dry yeast in a little water and add it at bottling time when you add your sugar. I've done this for bigger beers and it works nicely.

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Old 02-19-2010, 10:23 PM   #3
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You could try yeast washing off the primary cake and then adding a jar of washed yeast into the bottling bucket before bottling.

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Old 02-19-2010, 10:29 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by ReverseApacheMaster View Post
You could try yeast washing off the primary cake and then adding a jar of washed yeast into the bottling bucket before bottling.
my main reason for adding yeast would be to get new fresh yeast in there that isn't worn out from the long hard fermentation
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Old 02-20-2010, 08:43 PM   #5
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my main reason for adding yeast would be to get new fresh yeast in there that isn't worn out from the long hard fermentation
Just keep in mind that whatever yeast you use at bottling time will more than likely not be a noticable flavor addition. So, if you decided to used washed yeast (lots of work in my opinion), even if they are stressed to the point of creating off flavors (highly unlikely), you won't taste it.
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Old 02-20-2010, 08:49 PM   #6
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Dump most yeast into a 13% alcohol bath and they will go into a coma.

I have taken a good hearty yeast and added to my cooled priming solution. Waited until it got a little frothy, and added it to the bottling bucket.

This worked for a monster stout that was 16% ABV or so, kind of a bastardized krausening.

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Old 02-21-2010, 07:52 AM   #7
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Dump most yeast into a 13% alcohol bath and they will go into a coma.

I have taken a good hearty yeast and added to my cooled priming solution. Waited until it got a little frothy, and added it to the bottling bucket.

This worked for a monster stout that was 16% ABV or so, kind of a bastardized krausening.
what yeast would be good and hearty? I would prefer not to have to buy another smack pack as I already had to buy 2 to begin with
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Old 02-22-2010, 05:07 PM   #8
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I'm a little worried about a Barley Wine I bottled about a month ago. My hydrometer readings suggest that this one is about 11.5% My first mistake was that I didn't leave it in a warm area to carbonate. So I've moved some bottles to a warmer area and will be opening one soon in the hopes that it has actually carbonated. If not, I guess I'll be opening each bottle and adding in some champagne yeast or something along those lines.

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Old 02-22-2010, 06:46 PM   #9
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Pitch new yeast when bottling that barleywine. I used a half pack of dry yeast right into the bottling bucket (5 gal). I had a totally uncarbonated barleywine (fermented 5 weeks) without repitching.

If you have a bottled beer that did not carbonate after a couple of months in 70+ temps, it probably is never going to carbonate without help. Just dump them back into the bottling bucket, add yeast, then re-bottle. Be as careful as you can not to splash and oxidize the beer. When I did this, I put the beer right back into the same bottles they just came out of. So far, it has worked very well.

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Old 02-22-2010, 07:16 PM   #10
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so what kind of yeast should I pitch?

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